Monthly Archives: October 2016

Transcribe Postscript: Big Thanks to All of Those Who Helped Transcribe the PCI Newspapers!

The Virginia Newspaper Project would like to give a big thank you to those who transcribed the Petersburg Classical Institute manuscript newspapers on the Library of Virginia’s Transcribe page–It happened faster than we could have imagined!

We encourage those who have not yet visited Transcribe to do so to see the many other documents awaiting transcription. The image below shows some of the varied collections on Transcribe:

Transcribe (1)

http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe/ Oct. 27, 2016

Another way history lovers can help make historical information more accessible is to become a registered member of Virginia Chronicle and correct OCR text. To learn how, simply go to the Virginia Chronicle site, click the “help” tab and choose “how to correct OCR text.” If you have questions, please email kelley.ewing@lva.virginia.gov. So far, volunteers have corrected over 615,000 lines of newspaper text in the Virginia Chronicle database. Huge thanks to them too!

Va Chronicle

http://virginiachronicle.com/ Oct. 27, 2016

 … read more »

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Now on Transcribe: the Manuscript Newspapers of Petersburg Classical Institute

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software does the amazing work of converting newspaper type into searchable text, but the task of making hand written documents searchable requires human intervention.

Transcribe, the Library of Virginia’s crowdsourcing transcription tool, gives volunteers the opportunity to transcribe digitized primary source materials from the LVA’s collections, thus making the documents searchable and much more accessible. Letters, diaries, legislative petitions, court records, receipts, coroners’ inquisitions, WPA life histories and, now, newspapers, can all be found on Transcribe.

Transcribe

http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe/ Oct. 17, 2016

While manuscript, or hand-written, newspapers are exceedingly rare, the Library has a notable collection (part of the Petersburg Classical Institute records, 1838-1847 Accession 23479) dating from 1842-1843 done by the students of the Petersburg Classical Institute. Because OCR will not work on these pages, we thought they’d be a perfect addition to the Transcribe catalog where they can now be transcribed by dedicated volunteers.

The Petersburg Classical Institute, originally known as Petersburg Academy, was incorporated in 1838 under the guidance of Rev. Ephraim D. Saunders. Its aim was to teach the “higher branches of liberal education” to boys ages ten to eighteen and it Imaged by LVA Photo and Digital Imaging ServicesAugust 2016generally taught 140-150 pupils per year. Richard McIlwaine, eleventh president of Hampden-Sydney College, attended in 1844 and described it as “one of the finest, if not by all odds ahead, of all schools of its grade in the Commonwealth.” Many of its students went on to prominent careers as clergymen, educators, lawyers, and businessmen.

The Tattler, Hit Him Again, Dies Festus Tempora and The Democrat, beautiful examples of manuscript newspapers, were written with humor and sarcasm by the Institute’s students–it is not a stretch to imagine K-12 aged boys creating something similar today. Typical content consisted of student gossip, political news, poetry and advertisements–columns also contained cut out etchings, … read more »

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Portraits of a Prophet: 100 Years of Nat Turner in Print

GoL Sept. 3, 1831“I have a horrible and heart-rending tale to relate,” read a letter from the editor of the Norfolk Herald and printed in the Sept.3, 1831 issue of the Genius of Liberty, “and lest even its worst features might be distorted by rumor and exaggeration, I have thought it proper to give you all and the worst information that has reached us through the best sources of intelligence which the nature of the case will admit.”

The “horrible and heart-rending talethe letter described was a violent slave rebellion which had taken place about sixty miles west of Norfolk in Southampton County, Virginia. “A fanatic preacher by the name of Nat Turner (Gen. Nat Turner),” reported the Richmond Enquirer, “was at the bottom of this infernal brigandage. (Aug. 30, 1831)”

By the time the revolt was over, sixty men, women and children had been killed. But as Scot French’s book, The Rebellious Slave: Nat Turner in American Memory, explains, “First the white people fell. . . Then the black people fell.” The Richmond Constitutional Whig of Sept. 3, 1831 reported that many slaves were slaughtered by retaliating mobs “without trial and under circumstances of great barbarity.” The death toll among the enslaved, many of whom played no part in the revolt, was in the hundreds.

Rather than describe the events of “Nat’s War”, the Newspaper Project hopes to show how newspapers talked about Nat Turner and how they variously portrayed him in the decades following his life and death.  With a myriad of descriptions over the years, from “distinguished immortal spirit” to “wild fanatical,” Turner’s legacy was appropriated by different groups to both frighten and inspire.

On Aug. 12, 1867 the Richmond Dispatch published a long editorial titled “Nat Turner’s Massacre.” The Dispatch, Richmond’s daily newspaper … read more »

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ThroTTle is Here.

Throttle 3

It is said that companies from Apple, Amazon, and Google to Disney and Harley Davidson began in a garage. For the alternative journal, ThroTTle, it wasn’t even a garage but a local  sub sandwich shop in Richmond, Virginia where the idea for the publication was born.

The Library of Virginia and the VNP are very excited to announce that ThroTTle has been added to the burgeoning list of titles that make up Virginia Chronicle, the Library’s online database of newspapers spanning 200 years.

Throttle 2

We at Fit to Print will take every opportunity to encourage the dedicated use of Virginia Chronicle and to try out the many user friendly features that many researchers say allows them to make the best and most efficient use of their time.

But getting back to ThroTTle, you can get a quick feel for the style and contents just by breezing through one of the issues. You would learn that it was printed in a tabloid format, that it was published in Richmond, Virginia from the 1981 to 1999, and, that the magazine offered “an eclectic mix of fiction, news, humor, art and photography.” That is how Dale M. Brumfield – one of the founding members of ThroTTle – described the initial issue in his informative book, Richmond Independent Press. It seems that is a pretty good description of Throttle for issues to come.

But decide for yourself. Check out the wide array of topics and writings that ThroTTle offered in its near two decade run. Virginia Chronicle’s publication calendar reveals the life cycle of an alternative publication that was forever in search of financial solid ground. But today, in 2016, we can offer the reader a digitized version of what we think is a landmark publication in the world of the … read more »

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