Now on Transcribe: the Manuscript Newspapers of Petersburg Classical Institute

Optical Character Recognition (OCR) software does the amazing work of converting newspaper type into searchable text, but the task of making hand written documents searchable requires human intervention.

Transcribe, the Library of Virginia’s crowdsourcing transcription tool, gives volunteers the opportunity to transcribe digitized primary source materials from the LVA’s collections, thus making the documents searchable and much more accessible. Letters, diaries, legislative petitions, court records, receipts, coroners’ inquisitions, WPA life histories and, now, newspapers, can all be found on Transcribe.

Transcribe

http://www.virginiamemory.com/transcribe/ Oct. 17, 2016

While manuscript, or hand-written, newspapers are exceedingly rare, the Library has a notable collection (part of the Petersburg Classical Institute records, 1838-1847 Accession 23479) dating from 1842-1843 done by the students of the Petersburg Classical Institute. Because OCR will not work on these pages, we thought they’d be a perfect addition to the Transcribe catalog where they can now be transcribed by dedicated volunteers.

The Petersburg Classical Institute, originally known as Petersburg Academy, was incorporated in 1838 under the guidance of Rev. Ephraim D. Saunders. Its aim was to teach the “higher branches of liberal education” to boys ages ten to eighteen and it Imaged by LVA Photo and Digital Imaging ServicesAugust 2016generally taught 140-150 pupils per year. Richard McIlwaine, eleventh president of Hampden-Sydney College, attended in 1844 and described it as “one of the finest, if not by all odds ahead, of all schools of its grade in the Commonwealth.” Many of its students went on to prominent careers as clergymen, educators, lawyers, and businessmen.

The Tattler, Hit Him Again, Dies Festus Tempora and The Democrat, beautiful examples of manuscript newspapers, were written with humor and sarcasm by the Institute’s students–it is not a stretch to imagine K-12 aged boys creating something similar today. Typical content consisted of student gossip, political news, poetry and advertisements–columns also contained cut out etchings, like the one pictured here from the Democrat, and hand done sketches.

To learn more about some of the interesting students who attended the Institute, a search of “Petersburg Classical Institute” on Virginia Chronicle turns up a number of articles on the prominent alumni who once graced its halls. Out of the Box also published a blog about the papers in 2011.I

Please visit Transcribe today to check out these and the many other documents awaiting transcription. Thanks to the work of its volunteers, over 20,000 documents have been transcribed, fulfilling the Library’s important mission of making Virginia’s history more accessible to everyone.

 

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