Tag Archives: Crowdsourcing

1,000,000 Lines Corrected on Virginia Chronicle

1 millionthank youVirginia Chronicle, the Library of Virginia’s digital newspaper database, has surpassed an impressive milestone!

The Virginia Newspaper Project would like to give a big thank you to all of the Registered Users of Virginia Chronicle who have corrected text. Together, 363 text correctors have corrected over 1,000,000 lines of text–and the top five Registered Users have contributed more than 500,000 lines of corrections!

text correctPlease, let’s keep the text correction numbers climbing! The more text corrected on Virginia Chronicle, the more effectively searchable the digitized newspapers. By becoming a registered user and right clicking on a page, you’re ready to go.  Becoming a registered user also offers perks like being able to create PDFs of pages and create categorical lists of articles you’d like to save.

The “help” menu has clear instructions on how to correct text or you can visit an old Fit to Print blog, which also provides text-correction instructions and explains why it’s necessary and important. THANK YOU all and let’s go for two million!

p.s. Virginia Chronicle has added some new titles this week:

Bath News, 1895-1897

Daily Express (Petersburg), 1855-1867

Daily Index (Petersburg), 23 Oct. 1865

Jeffersonian Republican (Lynchburg), 1828-1829 

Petersburg Daily Index, 1866

Petersburg Index, 1866-1868

Salem Sentinel, 1895-1902

Southern Musical Advocate and Singer’s Friend, 1859-1860

Staunton Telegram, 5 May 1883

 

 

 

 

 … read more »

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History Unfolded

The Virginia Newspaper Project is always eager to spread the word about historical crowd-sourcing projects that focus on newspapers as a source for information. Recently, a colleague notified us of one such project, sponsored by the US Holocaust Memorial Museum, called History Unfolded: US Newspapers and the Holocaust.

HU

https://newspapers.ushmm.org/ August 25, 2016

In its own words, the project seeks to “uncover what ordinary people around the country could have known about the Holocaust from reading their local newspapers in the years 1933–1945.” It asks “citizen historians” to find articles, op-eds, letters, and political cartoons from local newspapers about key topics such as Kristallnacht, Germany’s Annexation of Austria and FDR’s fourth Inaugural Address. As the project progresses it may add more topics, but for now, it is limited to twenty.

Events

https://newspapers.ushmm.org/ August 25, 2016

In its nationwide effort, History Unfolded hopes to offer a new understanding of how key events of the Holocaust were portrayed in contemporary small town newspapers. It also wants to show how newspapers discussed the debate over entry into the war and how the American press, as times grew more tumultuous, portrayed immigration and the refugee situation.  With the assistance of citizen historians, the History Unfolded database is quickly becoming a comprehensive resource which will be invaluable for scholars, historians, authors, and students.

Monocle 11 April 1933

Monocle article, April 11, 1933

One quick side note: while searching for content for History Unfolded, we here at the Newspaper Project discovered something interesting. The high school publication the Monocle was as pointed in its criticism of Hitler as any of its contemporary local weeklies. As early as 1933, the Monocle published insightful and scathing articles about Hitler’s treatment of the Jews in Germany. It makes sense that as war progressed, the students of John Marshall High watched world events unfold with … read more »

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Thank You!

I will conclude this blog with a thank you to Virginia Chronicle text correctors, but first let’s begin with a quick explanation. . . .

Optical Character Recognition, or OCR, is a process by which software reads a scanned newspaper page and translates its print into searchable text. While OCR technology enables searching of large quantities of data, like that contained in Virginia Chronicle, results are never 100% accurate. Because digitized images are taken from microfilm, OCR accuracy depends on both the print quality of the original newspaper and the image quality of the microfilmed copy. If the original newspaper print is poor or damaged or if microfilm images are faded, unevenly exposed, dark or blurry, it will negatively affect OCR accuracy.

As a registered user of Virginia Chronicle, you can assist in making its searchability better by correcting inaccurate OCR. In order to do so, become a registered user by clicking “Register” in the upper right corner of the home screen. Once you’re registered, you can begin correcting text.

Next, go to the page you would like to correct, right click on the page and choose “Correct page text.”

CorrectYou will then be asked to “select an area of the issue to correct its text.” After you have selected an area, the correctable text appears on the left of the screen and newspaper page on the right with a corresponding red box over the text to correct. At this point, you are ready to go. Don’t forget to click the “save” button to save any changes you’ve made.

Correct2 The Virginia Newspaper Project would like to extend big thanks to registered users of Virginia Chronicle who have already corrected over 27,000 lines of text! Thanks to such engaged users, a great research tool is made even better.

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