Tag Archives: Free Lance

From Middletown to Salem: Virginia Chronicle takes a road trip

The Virginia Newspaper Project is happy to announce new additions to the Library of Virginia’s Virginia Chronicle. The number of historical newspaper pages available on Virginia Chronicle continues to grow–We’ll take a quick road trip to discover the latest titles that have been added:Middletown Weekly Masthead

Let’s start in northwestern Virginia in Middletown, located fourteen miles south of Winchester in beautiful Frederick County. The Middletown Weekly began in 1912 and was in the family of titles published by the Strasburg News Company. The last known issue, printed December 20, 1912, claimed the paper was taking a Christmas hiatus, but it may have been a permanent hiatus as there are no known copies found that were published after the yuletide. Thirty years later, in the 1940s, Patsy Cline, who was born in nearby Gore, VA, would make regular visits to Middletown.google maps

Now we’ll hop onto route 81, or route 11 if you prefer the scenic route, and drive ninety miles south of Middletown to visit the small and bucolic town of Greenville, Virginia. From 1882-1885, Greenville had its own newspaper, the Greenville Banner In its introductory issue it explained, “We will do the best we can to present a readable sheet and ask its patrons to make all allowance in reason and bear with its imperfections.” A motto we subscribe to ourselves! One fun fact about Greenville: It is where Kate Smith, famous for her rousing rendition of God Bless America, was born. Greenville Banner Masthead

Let’s get back in the car and go another seventy six miles down 81 until we hit Salem, Virginia, home to Roanoke College and the Salem Red Sox. Newspaper issues from 1883-1920 of the The Salem Times Register (called the Salem Times Register and Sentinel from 1903-1920) are now available on Virginia Chronicle as well. Additional issues of … read more »

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Happy Halloween From the Virginia Newspaper Project

 

vintage-halloween-black-cat-pumpkin-card

The Virginia Newspaper Project wishes you a very festive and  super spooky Halloween. Enjoy some ghoulish tales, get helpful Halloween party tips and learn about some Halloween traditions of yesteryear in these articles from the Times-Dispatch, Free Lance and Our Church Paper. If you dare, read about the “Chain of Horrors” that haunted the site of Washington DC’s Commercial Club, and then savor the tale of Harry Brown and Frank Gray, who went into a haunted house to visit its ghostly inhabitants, and never came out. In “A True Ghost Story” learn how Mildred Edwards’s declaration that there are “no such things as ghosts” is challenged when she visits “the Old Walton Place.” For more tales of terror, visit Chronicling America and Virginia Chronicle and search “haunted house.”  And, if you’re not sure how to decorate for a successful Halloween party, you can find creative ideas from the Woman’s Page of the October 27, 1912 issue of the Times Dispatch.

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The Free Lance

Located in Spotsylvania County, 61 miles north of Richmond and 60 miles south of Washington, D.C., between the Tidewater and Piedmont regions of Virginia, Fredericksburg was a major port on the Rappahannock River, a significant crossroads during the late 18th and early 19th centuries and an important center of trade and commerce. The town was also the scene of fierce fighting and considerable destruction during the Civil War.

In an attempt to offer an alternative voice in postwar Virginia and to help boost the slowly recovering regional economy, the Free Lance was established in Fredericksburg in 1885 under the leadership of William E. Bradley and John W. Woltz, a former chairman of Virginia’s Republican delegation. Thirty-four stockholders also contributed to the operations of the paper as investors in the Free Lance Newspaper and Job Printing Company. It was apparent from the earliest issues of the Free Lance that the war was deeply imprinted on people’s minds and that political divisions in the South were still bitterly contentious. The Free Lance characterized itself as an “Independent” paper “devoted to Agricultural, Commercial and Manufacturing Interests of Fredericksburg and its Vicinity.” Its chief competitors, the Fredericksburg Star and the News, were decidedly Democratic. The Star immediately questioned the political leanings of Woltz and the paper’s stockholders, prompting the Free Lance in its second issue to reply: “We repeat, we see enough already to convince us that the Star is disposed ‘to pick a quarrel’ with the Lance, which we shall be slow to enter, and which we now proclaim will be unprofitable, unwise and which, we shall avoid if possible and permitted.”

In fact, the Free Lance defended its mission–and its stockholders–with vigor. “Republicans, (even though they be unnatural human beings from the standpoint of the Star), don’t feel like … read more »

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