Tag Archives: Illustration

Happy Birthday Mr. President

In honor of George Washington’s 286th birthday, we thought we’d share some of the many front page renderings of the nation’s Founding Father drawn by men of the Civilian Conservation Corps. Nearly 100 CCC newspaper titles have been digitized and are available on Virginia Chronicle. The rest of the collection will be added soon: wASHIGNTONdWashington (8)Geaorge Washington (1) Washington (7) Washington(3) Washington(6) Washington .Washington (9)read more »

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VNP Announces the CCC

Big Timber Times Onion CCCThe Virginia Newspaper Project (VNP) is thrilled to announce an ongoing project to make the Library of Virginia’s Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) newspapers available on Virginia Chronicle. The camp newspapers in the LVA’s collection, published from 1934 to 1941 by the young men of the CCC, were mostly distributed in camps throughout the Commonwealth, though a handful are from locales outside Virginia.

The array of titles vary in sophistication, regularity and skill, but as a whole they offer a vivid picture of camp life during the Depression.  Though the physical demands of CCC work could be exhausting, a youthful spirit radiates from the pages of the CCC newspapers: work safety reminders, camp classes and events, health columns, editorials, sports reports, cultural news and illustrations were regular features in many of the papers, but each had its own distinct flavor.

The camp newspapers are also packed with the names of people who were active in the CCC–you might find a mention of one of your relatives among the pages. Click here to learn more about the CCC and the newspapers they produced.

There is a great side note to this project we can’t neglect to mention. The CCC newspaper collection was preserved on both microfilm and microfiche for the Center for Research Libraries in 1991 by MicrogrAphic Preservation Service (MAPS):Kally targetDid you happen to notice the name “Kelly L. Barrall” under the list of camera operators? The very same Kelly L. Barrall recently managed the project to digitize the microfiche she  helped create over 25 years ago! Though MAPS has changed its name to Backstage Library Works, the company is still going strong, microfilming and digitizing archival collections.

Kelly Barrall digitizing the very same microfiche she helped create over 25 years ago.

Kelly Barrall digitizing the same microfiche she helped create over 25 years ago.

Big thanks to all of those at Backstage … read more »

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Advertising the Big Top: 1870s Circus Ads from the Staunton Spectator

SS Sept 16, 1873 (Lent)It’s September 16, 1873 in the sleepy town of Staunton, Virginia. You can only imagine a reader’s excitement at turning to page three of the Staunton Spectator to discover an ad for Lewis Lent’s New York Circus with its illustrations and long list of spectacular attractions: For a mere seventy-five cent admission (fifty cents for children under ten), one could see grand balloon ascension, wild beasts, breathing sea monsters, ornately plumed birds, flesh eating reptiles and 5000 museum marvels!

Born in upstate New York in 1813, Lewis Lent began his circus career in 1834. Soon after, he became a partner in the Brown & Lent Circus, which moved from town to town via riverboat. Over the years, Lent joined various circus troupes, but his New York Circus, which ran from 1873 to 1874, advertised here in the Staunton Spectator, was the last show he owned and operated before retiring.Staunton Spectator 16 Sept 1873 (2)SS 16 Sept 1873SS 16 Sept 1873 (2)SS 16 Sept. 1873Though the heyday of the traveling circus in the US might have been a bit later, the circus advertisements in newspapers of the 1860s and 1870s are evidence of its growing popularity and allure. The impetus for such elaborate newspaper advertising was the fierce competition between traveling shows. With beautiful illustrations of zebras, elephants, hippos, giraffes and tigers, acrobats standing on horse back, uniformed musicians, dancing dogs and trapeze artists, circus advertisements were an enticing and powerful promotional tool.

In the October 12, 1877 issue of the Staunton Spectator on page three, next to want ads and announcements, there is a full two column ad for John O’Brien’s circus, “The Largest Show ever in Virginia!” The ad for O’Brien’s circus promised mechanical marvels, three full military bands, palace opera chairs, 53 dens of wild beasts and six (yes, six!) stupendous shows rolled into one.SS O'Brien's circusJohn O‘Brien, born in 1836, became … read more »

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Pets in the Papers

With the “Importance of Being Cute, Pet Photography in Virginia 1840-2013″ exhibit currently at the Library of Virginia, the Virginia Newspaper Project thought it a pertinent time to feature pet related images and stories from its newspaper collection. Animals have always been a popular topic in newspapers and these are only the tip of the iceberg of what’s available. The newspapers featured here can be found on Virginia Chronicle, the Library’s database of digitized historical newspapers.

A gift for Maud, from the comic pages of the Times Dispatch, April 26, 1903:Dog Comic 1DogComic2DogComic3

Bruno, the loyal watchdog, taking a break from his duties, from the Virginia Farm Bureau News:Bruno

Don’t worry about getting tired, young pup, you have Twee Deedle’s help! From the Times Dispatch, September 8, 1912:TeeDeedle

Sometimes, when it’s time to play, our canine friends get “In the Way.” Cartoon from the Richmond Planet, October 14, 1905:No Dogs allowed

“The Thrilling Experiences of a Loyal Young Unionist and His Noble Horse,” from the “Campfire Stories” series, published  in the Richmond Planet, October 21, 1899:Polly

From the article “Canine Globe-Trotters” published in the the Roanoke Times, March 17, 1892:Auchland

Rob

A fierce battle between man and shark and dinner for three sea cats, from the Richmond Planet, July 1, 1899:SharkCat

“Costly Cats” are all the rage in London and Paris. From the Richmond Planet, November 12, 1898:Costly Cats

And no animal blog is complete without a baby miniature horse. From the Virginia Farm Bureau News, June 1978:Minihorse

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