Tag Archives: Temperance

Woe Unto Him: Anti-Liquor on Virginia Chronicle & Say Goodbye to Booze tonight at the LVA

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In conjunction with the Library of Virginia’s current exhibition, Teetotalers & Moonshiners: Prohibition in Virginia, the Virginia Newspaper Project has made its sole issue of the Prohibition newspaper Anti-Liquor available on Virginia Chronicle.

Established in 1890 by John R. Moffet, Reverend of Memorial Baptist Church in Danville, Virginia, the weekly newspaper was, “issued for the sole purpose of educating the people upon the evils of the drink habit, and especially to turn light upon the question of Legal Prohibition.”

According to Lester Cappon’s Virginia Newspapers 1821-1935, a Lynchburg temperance monthly, the Truth, was absorbed by Anti-Liquor in 1891. Moffet continued editing the paper after the merger until he was gunned down by one of his many political opponents in Danville on November 11, 1892.  A history of the Reverend Moffet’s church explained, “John R. Moffett died a martyr’s death at the hand of an assassin’s bullet for the cause of temperance.” Anti-Liquor ceased publication shortly after his death.

And visit the Library tonight, May 5, for what promises to be a fun event: “Goodbye, Booze”: The Music of Prohibition (with a Beer Chaser), offering traditional live music and beer crafted in honor of the Library’s exhibition. The event goes from 5:30 to 7:30, so come thirsty and ready to learn more about Prohibition, one of our nation’s most intriguing experiments.

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