Tag Archives: Virginia Chronicle

Extra! Titles Added to Virginia Chronicle

New titles have been added to the Library of Virginia’s digital newspaper repository Virginia Chronicle, including issues of the “Monthly Journal of Mountain Life” the Mountain Laurel. As it describes itself in the first issue, “The ‘Mountain Laurel’ will not keep you informed of world events. It will not be a substitute for your local newspaper. What it will be is a journey each month into ‘the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains.’”

Also new to Virginia Chronicle, the Church Advocate, an African American newspaper published out of Baltimore from 1892-1893, the earliest issues of the Peninsula Enterprise of Accomac, Virginia and a precious few issues of the Staunton Eagle and the Republican Farmer of Staunton from 1809-1811. Check out Virginia Chronicle and stay tuned for more to come!

Mountain LaurelChurch AdvocatePeninsula EnterpriseStaunton EagleRepublican Farmerread more »

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John Mitchell, Jr. Strong Men & Women Panel Discussion at LVA

Come on down to the Library of Virginia tomorrow night for what promises to be a fascinating discussion of the life and legacy of John Mitchell, Jr. For details, read the description below, taken from the Library’s calendar of events:

STRONG MEN & WOMEN PANEL DISCUSSION John Mitchell: Life and Legacy of Richmond’s “Race Man”
Planet's ForceWednesday, February 19, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM–8:30 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  Free

Early in the 20th century, the term “race man” described a public figure who promoted the interests of African Americans on every front. John Mitchell published the Richmond Planet from 1884 to 1929 and made it one of the most influential black newspapers of its time. Greg McQuade of Richmond news station WTVR moderates a conversation on this important figure with historian Roice Luke, biographer Ann Field Alexander, and journalist Brenda Andrews.

 

A reception follows the program and rarely seen editions of the Planet will be on display.

This program, part of the Strong Men & Women in Virginia History project, is free and open to the public. It is underwritten by a generous gift from Dominion.… read more »

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Virginia Chronicle

manExciting News.

The Virginia Newspaper Project and the Library of Virginia invite you to visit Virginia Chronicle, the Library’s online newspaper database and repository. We have added close to 300,000 pages to Virginia Chronicle that the Newspaper Project originally contributed to Chronicling America as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program.

But there’s more. Virginia Chronicle will include titles that are either outside the scope of the NDNP or that have particular interest for those doing Virginia related research. For example, the Library partnered with the Virginia Farm Bureau, an advocacy group for the farming industry, to include issues from the 1940’s to 1999 of the Farm Bureau News on Virginia Chronicle.

Our Church Paper (New Market, 1875-1904) will be added in the next few days.

Look for the following titles to be added to Virginia Chronicle in the coming weeks:

Amherst Progress 1904-1922

Campaign 1884-1888 Richmond

Afro-American Churchman 1886-1890 Petersburg

Missionary Weekly 1889-1890 Richmond

Jeffersonian Republican 1859-1889 Charlottesville

Children’s Friend 1865-1884 Richmond

Critic 1887-1889 Richmond

Evening News 1868-1873 Harrisonburg

Roanoke Baptist Union/Baptist Union 1888-1914

Evening Truth 1887 Richmond

Virginia Farmer 1908-1909 Emporia

Virginia Chronicle also offers patrons a text correcting option, a great new feature that we’re excited to have added to the database. By simply registering, users can assist in correcting text that may have been missed or “misread” by optical character recognition (OCR) software. OCR is impressive technology but it’s not perfect and through user participation, text correcting will improve search results while making a very good database even better.… read more »

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Cooking today with Our Church Paper

Eggs!?

Eggs!?

New Market, established 1796 in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley and settled largely by German Lutherans and Mennonites, was home to Our Church Paper, a Lutheran weekly published from 1873-1905 by Henkel & CO.’s Steam Printing House. Founded in 1806 by the Reverend Ambrose Henkel who, according to A History of Shenandoah County, got his start in the printing business when in 1802, at the age of 16, he walked to Hagerstown, Maryland from New Market to apprentice with a printer by the name of Gruber, who was known for almanacs.  Shortly thereafter he purchased his own press and “hauled it up the valley to New Market” where he set up and began printing a German newspaper called The Virginia and New Market Popular Instructor and Weekly News.  From 1806 to 1925 the press was operated by various members of the Henkel family, printing works in the interests of the Lutheran church.

Our Church Paper was perhaps the most well-known publication by the Henkel press. The paper was “devoted to the interests of the Evangelical Lutheran Church” and offered ”articles of faith and doctrine, it will contain much of admonition, besides matter of general interest to the family.” The first page was always a printed sermon, followed by local and national news of particular interest to Lutherans on pages two and three, and then a bounty of recipes, home remedies, household wisdom and light humor on page four.

From that last page today’s reader can get a sense of how it was to run a household around the turn of the last century. It certainly wasn’t easy; take for example the article on achieving the perfect cup of coffee at the top of the page. We can take for granted modern food processing and household improvements such as precise … read more »

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