Tag Archives: Virginia Newspaper Project

George Wythe: FFDWR (Founding Father Deserving Wider Recognition)

Wythe“No man ever left behind him a character more venerated than George Wythe.  His virtue was of the purest tint; his integrity inflexible, and his justice exact; of warm patriotism, and, devoted as he was to liberty, and the natural and equal rights of man, he might truly be called the Cato of his country.”

That’s Thomas Jefferson, not only a former student but trusted friend, and the statement most often quoted in biographical accounts, long or short, of Wythe’s life.

The following observation speaks to the maintenance of the body in support of that spirit so deservedly praised and is from William Munford, one of the last students Wythe (pronounced “with”) would mentor.  It provides a better caption for the image above, 5th and Grace in downtown Richmond, as it fits the person into a space, bland though it may appear here in the historical present.

“”Old as he is, his habit is, every morning, winter and summer, to rise before the sun, go to the well in the yard, draw several buckets of water, and fill the reservoir for his shower bath, and then, drawing the cord, let the water fall over him in a glorious shower. Many a time have I heard him catching his breath and almost shouting with the shock. When he entered the breakfast room his face would be in a glow, and all his nerves were fully braced.”

No one’s nerves, however, could be braced for what would follow Wythe’s daily ritual the morning of May 25, 1806, almost 15 years after Wythe’s departure from Williamsburg to Richmond to preside over the Capital’s Chancery Court. That an 81 year old revered Founding Father (participant in the Second Continental Congress, signer of the Declaration of Independence, the country’s first law professor, classics scholar-a … read more »

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The Weekly Progress — The People’s Progressive Paper of Powhatan

The Library of Virginia recently came into the possession of a rare Powhatan newspaper–while it’s not an original copy, the photocopied edition of the Weekly Progress contains valuable local history of Powhatan county and towns nearby.

Weekly Progress Front PageThe big news in the 14 July 1899 issue, featured on its front page with large illustrations of those involved, was the murder of Senator William M. Flanagan  by the young lawyer William Premium offer 1Garland Pilkinton, both of Powhatan. On page four, the Progress informed its readers that it would provide a full account of the Pilkinton-Flanagan murder trial–”Be sure that you do not miss the chance to read all of it,” it reminded.

It must be noted, considering it is such a curious feature of the paper, that whomever was writing for the Weekly Progress was an ardent fan of alliteration as evidenced by all of the column headings throughout the paper–”Belona Brevities,” Tobaccoville Talk,” “Othma Occurances,” and “Home Happenings” are just a few among many other alliterated column headings–most of which offered tidbits on local residents like “Miss Lee Lewis visited her aunt, Miss Marian Carter, Sunday” and “Miss Addie has returned home after a pleasant stay in Richmond.”

As a perk for existing subscribers, the Weekly Progress had the “Progress Premium Offer” which awarded fabulous prizes to anyone who could obtain new subscriptions for the paper. Prizes ranged from a top buggy for securing 100 subscribers to a breach-loading double-barrel shotgun for 30 subscribers.

And since the Progress was published in rural Powhatan county, it wouldn’t have been complete without husbandry advice. This issue included a review of the Biggle Horse Book whose motto was, “Always speak to a horse as you would to a gentleman.” Good advice, we think.… read more »

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Set The Way-Back Machine!

The Library of Virginia is the home of the Virginia Newspaper Project. In 1997, the Library of Virginia moved to a new building at 800 East Broad Street in Richmond, Va. The building takes up the entire block between 9th and 8th street going east and west and between Marshall and Broad Street looking north and south.

The Library of Virginia.

The Library of Virginia.

When a Project colleague mused that he remembers taking a bus from a station he thought was near the Library’s current location, we scrambled to do a bit of research. And sure enough, on the north-west corner of 9th and Broad Street sat the local Trailways bus station.

It stood there for decades until the late 1980′s when Greyhound established a centralized depot at a new location in Richmond. The colleague reminisced about catching a bus at the old Trailways station at 9th Street, which got him to Staunton, Virginia where he often cooled his heels for hours waiting for a connection to take him north toward Winchester and Woodstock. Here is a photo from the late 1950′s. The local Trailways bus station stood at the same location as where the Library of Virginia stands today.

    Broad Street looking west. But what does this have to do with newspapers? We're just making a momentary stop as we travel back to around 1888.

Broad Street looking west. But what does this have to do with newspapers? We’re just making a momentary stop as we travel back to around 1888.

We’ve talked about the 1950s, now let’s go back 125 years ago. Back then, the Swan Tavern occupied the East 800 block of Broad Street. Built in the late 1780′s, the Swan Tavern managed a remarkably long life until it was demolished in 1904. And, yes, notable people such as Thomas Jefferson and Edgar Allan Poe were known to have slept there and most likely to have enjoyed an evening cordial or two.

But more to the … read more »

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“Your Attention Residents, Now Arriving at Gates H and C, Dulles International Airport.” The Herndon-Chantilly Times (1958-1962).

I didn’t anticipate opening today’s “Fit To Print” blog entry in quite this manner but I stumbled on it mainly by chance and, for someone with an already strong fondness for maps, the opportunity proved irresistible.  Below, the center two pages of the November 9, 1944 issue of the Herndon News-Observer:

Fairfax Map“Poor Fairfax County, it didn’t know what was coming”, remarked a colleague.  I imagined Til Hazel (if unfamiliar, google away) replying, “Poor?”   In 1950 the county knew a major airport in its borders was a real possibility; Congress had green lighted appropriation.  By 1955, it was determined that Burke (just east of the city of Fairfax on the map) would not be the site.  Organized resistance prevailed.  For planners now, the priorities were less resistance, a warmer welcome, and much more space-an important consideration for an airport with jets foremost in mind.  The decision was made to move west, to Loudoun County, leaving a trailing foot in Fairfax.  Here’s the Loudoun Times-Mirror, January 16, 1958.

LTM Jan 16 1958Then after the jump, this map:

Map2This was without question an economic life-changer and, for the local press, a huge story with multiple angles and it was forming directly in the front yard of the Leesburg based Times-Mirror.  But for Herndon (a historic town, incorporated in 1879) and Chantilly  (an intersection) it was on their front porch pressing against the door and promising a revenue wind velocity not previously reckoned.  The News-Observer was long gone, having departed later in the 1940’s.  An opportunity beckoned to establish a presence in boomtown, west Fairfax County.  The first issue of the Herndon-Chantilly Times (like the Times-Mirror, a weekly) appears on May 15 with the masthead describing it as an “edition of the Loudoun Times-Mirror”. By this issue the following July it … read more »

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What a Long, Oderus Trip It’s Been: Four Decades of GWAR in Richmond’s Weekly and Alternative Press

In Memory of Dave Brockie (1963 – 2014)

Perhaps the earliest newspaper photo of Oderus Urungus (A.K.A Dave Brockie) of GWAR?  From VCU’s student newspaper The Commonwealth Times, 4 November 1986.

Halloween 3Announcement for GWAR’s “Phallus in Wonderland” a “Completely unique mini-musical movie.” From Throttle, Jan/Feb 1992.

Announcement for GWAR's "Phallus in Wonderland" a "Completely unique mini-musical movie." From Throttle, Jan/Feb 1992.

List of Richmond’s best local bands chosen by The Richmond Music Journal, 1993.

Excerpt from the article “We Tried Everything There is to do in Richmond in 24 Hours” written by John Sarvay. At 4:30, a visit to the Slave Pit. From Caffeine, August 1993.

Column “Ramblings” announces GWAR’s upcoming tour. From Throttle, April/May 1994.

RAWG (GWAR without costumes) playing at Twisters. From The Richmond Music Journal, February 1999.

Excerpt and photo from “Time and Money: GWAR’s Biggest Enemies,” RVA Magazine, vol. 4, issue 2, 2008.

Excerpt from the piece “Spawned and Spurned” by Landis Wine. From RVA Magazine vol. 5, issue 4, 2009.

 GWAR’s Oderus Urungus (A.K.A. Dave Brockie) on the cover of Style, 28 March 2012.

The Original Scumdogs. From Style 28 March 2012.

 … read more »

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Extra! Titles Added to Virginia Chronicle

New titles have been added to the Library of Virginia’s digital newspaper repository Virginia Chronicle, including issues of the “Monthly Journal of Mountain Life” the Mountain Laurel. As it describes itself in the first issue, “The ‘Mountain Laurel’ will not keep you informed of world events. It will not be a substitute for your local newspaper. What it will be is a journey each month into ‘the heart of the Blue Ridge Mountains.’”

Also new to Virginia Chronicle, the Church Advocate, an African American newspaper published out of Baltimore from 1892-1893, the earliest issues of the Peninsula Enterprise of Accomac, Virginia and a precious few issues of the Staunton Eagle and the Republican Farmer of Staunton from 1809-1811. Check out Virginia Chronicle and stay tuned for more to come!

Mountain LaurelChurch AdvocatePeninsula EnterpriseStaunton EagleRepublican Farmerread more »

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Soybeans and Beauty Queens: Newspaper Coverage of the Queens of the Crop

Apple Queen 1 Sept 1982

The Virginia Farm Bureau News, September 1982

The Virginia Farm Bureau News has been the go-to publication for farming news since it first appeared in 1941. With articles like “Should Grades be ‘Beefed’ Up” and “Choose Tobacco Varieties to Suit Soil and Climate” anything and everything related to agriculture has been printed on its pages. With its focus on agricultural news, it’s no wonder that the Virginia Farm Bureau News has, over the years, reported on annual festivals which celebrate the regional crops of Virginia, from peanuts and soybeans to apples and tobacco. These festivals have become important cultural events, not only for the excitement they generate, but also in shaping a town’s identity and creating a sense of local pride.

An important feature of local festivals, which often include food, music, dancing, a parade, and other general merriment, has been the crowning of a queen to represent the town’s respective main crop or agricultural product. “Be it pecans, asparagus or watermelons,” as the NPR story “All Hail the Asparagus Queen! How Ag Pageants Lure New Contestants,” recently explained, “many farming communities have also had a tradition of granting their prized commodity crops their very own monarchs.”  The Queen Arachis Hypogea (a.k.a Queen Peanut) once garnered as much attention as the illustrious queen of state, Miss Virginia. Here are a few queens of the crops the Farm Bureau News has celebrated over the decades:

Miss VFBF Jan 1976

Virginia Farm Bureau News, January 1976

Not only has the Farm Bureau News provided faithful coverage of festival beauties, but the Farm Bureau organization has also chosen its own representative annually since the 1950s.  The conditions for competing for Miss VFBF (Virginia Farm Bureau Federation) in 1970 were that the contestant “must be a daughter of a producer member of the Farm Bureau. She must read more »

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John Mitchell, Jr. Strong Men & Women Panel Discussion at LVA

Come on down to the Library of Virginia tomorrow night for what promises to be a fascinating discussion of the life and legacy of John Mitchell, Jr. For details, read the description below, taken from the Library’s calendar of events:

STRONG MEN & WOMEN PANEL DISCUSSION John Mitchell: Life and Legacy of Richmond’s “Race Man”
Planet's ForceWednesday, February 19, 2014
Time: 7:00 PM–8:30 PM
Place: Lecture Hall,  Free

Early in the 20th century, the term “race man” described a public figure who promoted the interests of African Americans on every front. John Mitchell published the Richmond Planet from 1884 to 1929 and made it one of the most influential black newspapers of its time. Greg McQuade of Richmond news station WTVR moderates a conversation on this important figure with historian Roice Luke, biographer Ann Field Alexander, and journalist Brenda Andrews.

 

A reception follows the program and rarely seen editions of the Planet will be on display.

This program, part of the Strong Men & Women in Virginia History project, is free and open to the public. It is underwritten by a generous gift from Dominion.… read more »

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Snow Dazed

Front page of the Richmond Times Dispatch, Feb. 8, 1936

Front page of the Richmond Times Dispatch, Feb. 8, 1936

A perennial subject for newspapers is snow storms. In Richmond, forecasters are calling for 4 – 8 inches on Wednesday and Thursday. The debilitating effects of snow are much the same today as they were 75 years ago. Here are a couple of samples from historic snowfalls in Richmond, Virginia from January 24, 1940 and February 8, 1936.

Snow related articles from Richmond Times Dispatch, Feb. 8, 1936

Snow related articles from page 1 of Richmond Times Dispatch, Feb. 8, 1936

Page 2 from Richmond Times-Dispatch of Feb. 8, 1936

Page 2 from Richmond Times-Dispatch of Feb. 8, 1936

Article about snowstorm from Jan. 24, 1940.

Article about snowstorm from Jan. 24, 1940 Richmond Times-Dispatch.

As we all know, today’s storms are nothing compared with the blizzards of yesteryear. That’s as true today as it was in 1936 and here’s proof.

From Feb. 8, 1936 Richmond Times-Dispatch

From Feb. 8, 1936 Richmond Times-Dispatch

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Virginia Chronicle

manExciting News.

The Virginia Newspaper Project and the Library of Virginia invite you to visit Virginia Chronicle, the Library’s online newspaper database and repository. We have added close to 300,000 pages to Virginia Chronicle that the Newspaper Project originally contributed to Chronicling America as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program.

But there’s more. Virginia Chronicle will include titles that are either outside the scope of the NDNP or that have particular interest for those doing Virginia related research. For example, the Library partnered with the Virginia Farm Bureau, an advocacy group for the farming industry, to include issues from the 1940’s to 1999 of the Farm Bureau News on Virginia Chronicle.

Our Church Paper (New Market, 1875-1904) will be added in the next few days.

Look for the following titles to be added to Virginia Chronicle in the coming weeks:

Amherst Progress 1904-1922

Campaign 1884-1888 Richmond

Afro-American Churchman 1886-1890 Petersburg

Missionary Weekly 1889-1890 Richmond

Jeffersonian Republican 1859-1889 Charlottesville

Children’s Friend 1865-1884 Richmond

Critic 1887-1889 Richmond

Evening News 1868-1873 Harrisonburg

Roanoke Baptist Union/Baptist Union 1888-1914

Evening Truth 1887 Richmond

Virginia Farmer 1908-1909 Emporia

Virginia Chronicle also offers patrons a text correcting option, a great new feature that we’re excited to have added to the database. By simply registering, users can assist in correcting text that may have been missed or “misread” by optical character recognition (OCR) software. OCR is impressive technology but it’s not perfect and through user participation, text correcting will improve search results while making a very good database even better.… read more »

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