Tag Archives: Virginian Pilot

St. Patrick’s Day Miscellanea

By C Johnson, Newspaper Project Intern

times dispatch march 17 1911_2

To celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, we found a selection of the (very) broad ways that newspapers have chosen to acknowledge the feast day over the years.

The Weekly Register from Point Pleasant West Virginia published a poem, “The Shamrock,” in honor of St. Patrick’s Day on March 22, 1899. The next year, the  Virginian-Pilot published “Oran Gailig (Exile’s Song).” Both poems speak about the love an Irishman has for his country, and the longing felt when far from home.

Weekly Register 22 march 1899

Virginian Pilot March 18 1900

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The debate about proposed “Home Rule” versus a continued union with Britain shows up in Virginia papers even on St. Patrick’s Day, as shown in these political cartoons.

Richmond Times-Dispatch, March 17, 1913.

Norfolk Post, March 17, 1923.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Norfolk Post, March 17, 1922.

Norfolk Post, March 17, 1922.

 

The men in the Civilian Conservation Corp joined in the St. Patrick’s Day fun with themed covers for their camp newspapers, like this 1936 cover from Company 2344 in Big Stone Gap, Va.

Wise Owl March 23 1936

It wouldn’t have been the 1960s without a gelatin recipe for every occasion, and the Highland Recorder did not disappoint, offering a recipe for “peppermint flavored, green tinted gelatin dotted with miniature marshmallows.” If that sounds odd, give it a chance- they’re “sweet as the music of the harp,” and fully leprechaun endorsed.

Highland Recorder, March 17, 1966.

\ Highland Recorder, March 17, 1966.

If gelatin isn’t your thing, maybe take inspiration from the small boys who decided to take dessert acquisition into their own hands, and stole all the ice cream from this 1922 Norfolk party. We recommend asking first, though.

Norfolk Post, March 18, 1922.

Happy St. Patrick’s Day from the VNP!

Rappahannock Record 13 march 1986

 … read more »

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Awaiting the Great Path of Darkness – The Total Eclipse of 1900

27May_2

On a Monday, in late May, 1900, a corner of Virginia, under clear skies, experienced not the partial eclipse we’ll experience here in the Commonwealth, but a total eclipse of the sun.

Norfolk was one of the few major population sites in the United States situated in the path of totality. The eclipse path moved from the Gulf of Mexico into southeast America and then into the Atlantic Ocean.

We have selected images from the Newspaper Project’s digital archive, Virginia Chronicle, previewing a story of a celestial nature that previously had not been described in such detail by newspapers.

And consider that in-depth reporting of the eclipse belonged almost solely to the newspaper medium – before the advent of radio, television, and Instagram.  It is difficult to conceive, given our 21st century media landscape, that newspapers served as the primary source, and for many, the sole source, of information; hence the graphs, charts, and the heady mix of scientific facts and romantic conjecture.

The first front page coverage appeared on the preceding Thursday. It notes that teams of scientists and dozens of members of  the Geographical Society, as well as President William McKinley, will arrive to observe the phenomenon.

Solar Eclipse_2

Of the papers in the Tidewater region, only the Virginian-Pilot published illustrations like the following from Friday’s edition:

Illustration_1

Operating on the same principle that if you drain the Atlantic Ocean you’ll find the lost city of Atlantis, there was hope that the planet Vulcan would reveal itself during the solar eclipse. Alas, it remained undiscovered. For the curious, Wikipedia outlines the 19th century origins of the pursuit for the mystery planet.

More detail for the curious shows up, page 2, on Saturday:

Day 3_1

The Sunday edition featured the zodiac framed graphic shown at the top of this page, plus, … read more »

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