Carneal & Johnston Negative Collection

C1: 143 
ca. 1908–1924
194 glass-plate negatives, 21 film negatives

C1:143   Presentation drawing of Colonial Theater at 714 East Broad Street, Richmond, Virginia. Signed Hughson Hawley, 1919.   Carneal & Johnston Negative Collection  (LVA 10_0038_cj_162)

Architects William Leigh Carneal Jr. (1881–1958) and James Markam Ambler Johnston (1885–1974) founded their firm about 1908, after a year working independently but sharing office space in Richmond. Carneal & Johnston went on to become one of the most prolific and long-lived architectural practices in the state, by 1950 having shaped the distinctive architectural character of central Virginia, especially Richmond, with the completion of more than 1,300 buildings. The architects worked on a wide range of project types, from the mundane to the monumental, suburban bungalows to a proposed but never realized Ninth Street Victory Arch.

Amassed by the firm for documentary and promotional purposes, the Carneal & Johnston Collection photographically captures interior and exterior views of many commercial and municipal buildings, bridges, factories, apartments, and private residences, and includes a number of concept drawings entered into architectural competitions. Some of the most notable and easily recognizable structures represented in the collection include the First Virginia Regiment Armory (1913), the Richmond Dairy (1914) with its colossal milk bottles, the Colonial Theater (1919–1920), the Virginia State Office Building (1922–1923), and many collegiate gothic structures on the campuses of Richmond College (now the University of Richmond) and the Virginia Military Institute.

Arrangement and access:
The entire collection is available through DigiTool. The firm’s original numbering scheme has been maintained, though its rationale seems neither strictly chronological nor thematic.

Provenance:
Purchased 2009 

Related resources and collections:
Accession 43738, Carneal & Johnston Architectural Drawings and Plans, 1911–1990, Library of Virginia

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