Monthly Archives: August 2011

- Latest Issue of Broadside is Now Available

The summer 2011 issue of Broadside, the Library of Virginia’s quarterly magazine, is now available.  Broadside describes and illustrates the holdings and happenings at the Library of Virginia.  Discover fascinating items from the collections as well as events, exhibitions, educational programs, and opportunities to become more involved.

Click here to subscribe to Broadside or view past issues.… read more »

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- Primary Source Offers Questions and Clues About Will, Runaway Slave

Accomack County, Free Negro & Slave Records Box 1, Barcode 1138011.

Located among the odds and ends of Accomack County court records is this 1758 advertisement from Landon Carter of Richmond County for his runaway slave Will.  Landon Carter was one of the sons of Robert “King” Carter of Lancaster County and a rich man himself.  The advertisement is typical of runaway ads in that it seeks to provide as much information as possible about Will in order to facilitate his recapture:  looks, personality, friends and family, residence(s), and conjecture as to possible destination.  The ads are always interesting for what questions they provoke:  What was this “ill-Behaviour” that caused Will to be moved five counties north from Williamsburg to Richmond County?  What characteristics did he possess that would cause his owner to call him “sensible for a slave” (presumably a compliment)?  Were Will and Sarah particularly close, so much so that after his escape he risked fetching her so that she, too, could be free of slavery and the Carters?  Did Will, Sarah and Peter make good their getaway?

 (Citation: Accomack County, Free Negro & Slave Records Box 1, Barcode 1138011.)

 -Sarah Nerney, Senior Local Records Archivist… read more »

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- Additional Prince Edward County Chancery Causes Added to CRI!

One of the county's historical markers. Image from hmdb.org and used courtesy of Craig Swain.

Additional Prince Edward County chancery causes are now available on the Chancery Records Index. These additions span the years 1754 through 1883. Combined with the previously released images for Prince Edward County, the locality’s chancery causes have been digitized for the years 1754 through 1913.

Chancery cases are especially useful when researching local history, genealogical information, and land or estate divisions.  They are a valuable source of local, state, social, and legal history and serve as a primary source for understanding a locality’s history. Chancery causes often contain correspondence; property lists, including slaves; lists of heirs; and vital statistics, along with many other records.  Some of the more common types of chancery causes involve divisions of the estate of a person who died intestate (without a will); divorces; settlements of dissolved business partnerships; and resolutions of land disputes.

Here are a few of the cases you will find in the newly updated Prince Edward County chancery collection. To see more suits, go to the EAD guide and choose “Selected Suits of Interest” on the menu at the left.

 1755-001- Bridget Braithwaite by etc. v. Edward Braithwaite.  The wife sued for separate maintenance. Her husband abandoned her and was cohabiting with Joanna Sinclair, “a woman of ill fame and reputation” in the same parish and county. Bridget Braithwaite and her small children “are … read more »

- Aaron Burr Tried for Treason Today in 1807. Court Documents Here At LVA.


The indictment cover.

Two hundred four years ago, August 3, 1807, the former vice-president of the United States, Aaron Burr, was put on trial for treason. At a federal court held in the Virginia state capitol’s Old Hall of Delegates, John Marshall oversaw the proceedings and many of the most prominent names of the early federal period were subpoenaed, including the president Thomas Jefferson. The trial brought into question, among other things, the issues of executive privilege, state secrets, and the independence of the executive branch.

 Accused of plotting to foment war with Spain and seize land in the Midwest in order to form an independent nation, Burr was eventually acquitted of the charges. The trial records of the “Burr Conspiracy” are housed at The Library of Virginia’s archives along with the other records of the fourth circuit federal court. In addition to the original records of the trial, the LVA bookshelves hold numerous scholarly works examining the themes and controversies of one of the most sensational events of the day.


United States v. Aaron Burr, Indictment for Treason.

-Vince Brooks, Senior Local Records Archivist… read more »

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- Buy Me Some Peanuts And Cigarettes: Baseball Cards in the Archive


American Tobacco Company baseball card, T206 series (issued 1909-1911), featuring Ray Ryan of the Virginia League’s Roanoke Tigers. Item originally came with a pack of Old Mill cigarettes.


Contentnea Cigarettes baseball card, T209 series (issued 1910), featuring W. G. Smith of the Virginia League’s Portsmouth Truckers/Petersburg Goobers.

Tucked away in the Business Records Collections at the Library of Virginia are five 2.5 x 1.5 inch baseball cards issued by the American Tobacco Company.  Long before baseball cards were sold with bubble gum, they were sold with tobacco products.  Not only did the cards depict the major league stars of the day, but also minor leaguers throughout the country.  The five cards which make up the American Tobacco Company Baseball Cards collection (LVA Acc. 29187) feature Virginia League players.

Two of the cards in the collection, the color portraits of Perry Lipe and Ray Ryan, are part of what is known as the T206 series.  This series of cards, issued from 1909 to 1911, was sold with a wide range of tobacco products such as Sweet Caporal, Piedmont, and in the case of the Lipe and Ryan cards, Old Mill.  The minor leaguers in the series were from a variety of leagues across the country, including players from the Virginia, Texas, South Atlantic (Sally), and Southern Leagues.  The T206 series is known as the series containing the most valuable baseball card–the Honus Wagner card, which has been valued in some instances at over $2 million (based on condition).

The other three cards in LVA’s collection–of Martin (Marty) Walsh, George Cowan, and W. G. Smith–are part of the T209 photo series, printed in 1910.  … read more »

- “Multiple Exposure” and “Out of the Box” voted LVA’s top two blogs!

VCC_008027

Once the new blog “Multiple Exposure” came online we knew we were going to have to share the digital spotlight with our friends from Special Collections. We love it when we find interesting images in the archive we can share with you at “Out of the Box” but at “Multiple Exposure” interesting images are its stock-in-trade! See the weekly offering of family albums, postcards, mixed ephemera, bookplates, postcards, photographic prints, etc. Many of these images you will see nowhere else. Take a look today and consider registering for e-mail updates.

-Dale Dulaney, Local Records Archival Assistant… read more »

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