About: Roger

Roger has worked at the Library of Virginia since 1997 and currently works in the state records section. Roger has a Master of Arts degree in Public History from the University of South Carolina. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in History from Millersville University.

Author Archives Roger

Governor Terry McAuliffe: Building a New Virginia Economy (Web Archive)

Governor Terry McAuliffe skydives to the Virginia Beach Oceanfront on 2 June 2017 as part of the Virginia Beach Patriotic Festival.

Looking for the website of Governor Terry R. McAuliffe (2014-2018), which was taken down at the end of his term? The Library of Virginia can help. The Governor Terry McAuliffe Administration Collection (2014-2018) contains archived versions of the websites of the governor, cabinet, gubernatorial initiatives, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, as well as snapshots of their social media accounts (Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook). These sites are preserved as part of the Library of Virginia’s web archiving program.

Governor Terry McAuliffe becomes the first governor to fly in an autonomous aircraft, 18 May 2017, NASA Wallops Flight Facility.

The McAuliffe Administration web archive enables researchers to access the governor’s executive orders and directives, press releases, First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe’s No Hunger Campaign, and the Governor’s Top 5: This Week in the New Virginia Economy, a weekly compilation of the activities and achievements of the administration. The collection also contains the websites of Lt. Governor Ralph S. Northam and Attorney General Mark R. Herring.

Since 2005, the Library’s web archiving program has captured websites of enduring cultural value, especially those created and maintained by Virginia government. The collection includes the websites of the administrations of Governor Mark Warner (2002-2006), Tim Kaine (2006-2010), and Robert McDonnell (2010-2014) as well as Virginia state agency sites. We have also expanded into special topics of Virginia interest, such as the 2006 Senate race between George Allen and Jim Webb and the 2007 Virginia Tech … read more »

“Objection, Mr. Chairman!” – The Opening Session of the 1998 House of Delegates

The 1998 House of Delegates, Library of Virginia Special Collections, Prints & Photographs.

With the Virginia House of Delegates almost evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats when it convenes on Wednesday, 10 January 2018, Out of the Box decided to spotlight Library of Virginia records related to that last time the chamber was tied in 1998. A recent Washington Post article described the 14 January 1998 opening session of the House of Delegates as an “ugly spectacle.” The Richmond Times-Dispatch called it a “parliamentary WrestleMania.” You can now see for yourself. The Library has added video of a portion of this session to our YouTube Channel. The video is part of the recordings of the Virginia House of Delegates sessions, 1982-2011 (accession 50627) housed at the Library.

After the 1997 general election, the Democrats held a 51-48 majority in the House of Delegates with one independent. Republican Governor-elect James Gilmore (1998-2002) appointed two state senators, Joseph B. Benedetti (R) and Charles L. Waddell (D) and one Democratic delegate, David G. Brickley to positions in his administration. The appointments set off a chain-reaction of House and Senate special elections which culminated in the Republicans gaining one additional house seat. With independent delegate Lacey E. Putney agreeing to caucus with Republicans, the chamber would be tied when the session began. However, the State Board of Elections refused to accelerate certification of the Republican delegates elected in three 13 January … read more »

Taking Office: Inaugurations of Virginia’s Governors, 1942-2010

Lt. Governor-elect Ralph S. Northam and former President Bill Clinton, Inauguration Day, 11 January 2014. Photo taken by Michaele White, Visual Arts Coordinator, Office of the Governor.

Every four years, on the Saturday after the second Wednesday in January, Virginia’s three highest elected officials ­- the governor, the lieutenant governor, and the attorney general – are inaugurated. On Saturday 13 January 2018 at noon, Ralph S. Northam will be inaugurated as Virginia’s 73rd Governor. The oath of office also will be administered to Justin E. Fairfax as Lieutenant Governor, and Mark R. Herring as Attorney General. Witnessing the event will be both houses of the General Assembly, a large company of invited guests, and members of the news media. In a ceremony that has not changed significantly since the 1930s, the new governor and his colleagues will take an oath of office to support and defend the state’s constitution and execute the laws of the Commonwealth. To spotlight inaugural records in the collections of the Library of Virginia, we created a new Google Arts & Culture exhibit: Taking Office: Inaugurations of Virginia’s Governors, 1942-2010.

Based on a 2001-2002 exhibit in the Library’s lobby, Taking Office includes inaugural ephemera (tickets, passes, invitations, souvenirs) and photographs. Also included are some videos and WRVA radio broadcasts not included in the original exhibit. For an additional photographic sampling of past inaugurations, visit the small exhibition in the lobby of the Library of Virginia through the end of January 2018.  Inauguration day marks the … read more »

Opportunity Time: The Records of Virginia Governor Linwood Holton

Inauguration of Governor Linwood Holton, 17 January 1970, A. Linwood Holton Papers, 1943-1970. Accession 31535, Personal papers collection, Library of Virginia.

On Monday, 16 October 2017, the City of Roanoke will dedicate Holton Plaza, a new park named in honor of former Virginia Governor A. Linwood Holton (1970-1974). Out of the Box thought this would be a good time to spotlight some of the Library’s collections related to Holton.

Abner Linwood Holton Jr. was born 21 September 1923 in Roanoke, Virginia, to Abner Linwood Holton and Edith Van Gorder Holton. He attended local schools, before receiving his B.A. from Washington and Lee University in 1944. Holton served in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1946. He then attended Harvard Law School, receiving his LL.B. in 1949. Admitted to the Virginia bar that same year, Holton commenced practicing in Roanoke and became active in the Virginia Republican Party. Following an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1965, Holton then won election in 1969, serving as governor of Virginia from 1970 to 1974. After his term ended, he served as assistant secretary of state for congressional relations in 1974. Holton resigned that position and practiced law in Washington D.C. He married Virginia “Jinx” Harrison Rogers on 10 January 1953, and had four children with her: Anne, Tayloe, Woody, and Dwight.

Opportunity Time: A Memoir by Governor Linwood Holton, The University of Virginia Press, 2008.

Gubernatorial Records

  • The records of the Holton administration (1970-1974) are one of the largest 20th century gubernatorial collections held by the Library. Housed in
  • read more »

Antiguo Dominio: The Virginia Latino Advisory Board

Governor Robert F. McDonnell signs Hispanic and Latino Heritage Month proclamation, Executive Mansion, Richmond, Virginia, 6 October 2010, Press Office, Governor Robert McDonnell Administration (2010-2014).

Latinos and Hispanics have roots in Virginia dating back five centuries. In honor of Hispanic and Latino Heritage Month in Virginia (15 September to 15 October), Out of the Box is spotlighting the Virginia Latino Advisory Board (VLAB) and related records at the Library of Virginia.

On 7 October 2003, Governor Mark R. Warner (2002-2006) issued Executive Order 57 creating the Virginia Latino Advisory Commission (VLAC) to provide the administration with information about the growing Latino community in the Commonwealth. “One of the things that makes [sic] Virginia special is the rich diversity of its people, and my administration views our diversity as a source of strength,” Governor Warner said in a press release. “Our diverse and growing population of Virginians of Latino descent presents new opportunities for the Commonwealth, and the members of this new Commission bring a wide variety of professional, cultural, and entrepreneurial experience, as well as extensive records of community leadership.” The Virginia General Assembly passed legislation in 2005 turning the VLAC into a permanent board.

Renamed the Virginia Latino Advisory Board, the board has the power to:

  • Advise the Governor regarding the development of economic, professional, cultural, educational, and governmental links between the Commonwealth of Virginia, the Latino community in Virginia, and Latin America;
  • Undertake studies, symposiums, research, and factual reports to gather information to formulate and present recommendations
  • read more »

Higher Aim: Guns, Safety and Healing in the Era of Mass Shootings

Release of Virginia Tech Panel Report, Patrick Henry Building, Richmond, Virginia, 30 August 2007, Office of the Governor.

Editor’s Note: The Library of Virginia, in partnership with the
Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, sponsored four residential fellows for the 2016-2017 academic year to conduct in-depth research in the Library’s collections. Tom Kapsidelis, an independent author and former editor for the Richmond Times-Dispatch, spent the spring semester researching and writing Higher Aim: Guns, Safety and Healing in the Era of Mass Shootings.

On one of the last days of my fellowship at the Library in July 2017, I peeked at a lock of John Randolph’s hair, read a letter from Ida Tarbell to Joseph Bryan about the aftermath of the Civil War, and delved further into Kaine administration archives and records on the 16 April 2007 shootings at Virginia Tech. It was the collection of the Governor Timothy M. Kaine records that attracted me to the library as part of my yearlong fellowship with the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (VFH), the first semester in Charlottesville and the second here at the Library. The VFH has supported my continuing work on a book that examines some of the issues in the decade after the shootings, primarily through the experiences of survivors and others in the community who were deeply affected.

Over the past seven months I’ve peppered my office neighbors Brent Tarter, John Deal and Mari Julienne with questions about … read more »

Looney Tunes: the World War I Cartoons of M.A. Dunning

This is the latest entry in a series of blog posts spotlighting stories and records of Virginia’s involvement in World War I. The M.A. Dunning cartoons are part of the World at War: Library of Virginia WWI Collections.

               Heads Up takes pleasure in presenting to its readers the maiden effort at this post
of Private Dunning.  He has considerable previous experience in this line in both
civilian and army life.  His work will appear regularly each day.

                                                                                                                        Heads Up, vol. II, no. 4, 4 January 1919

Cartoon, Heads Up, 18 January 1919, U.S. Army Debarkation Hospital no. 52, Richmond College, Margaret Ethel Kelley Kern Papers, 1895-1949, Accession 23481, Personal papers collection, Library of Virginia.

During World War I, military camps, regiments, ships, and military hospitals often printed their own newspapers for military personnel stationed there, keeping them informed on both internal and external news. Heads Up (film 1670) served as the newspaper for Debarkation Hospital 52 located on the Richmond College (now University of Richmond) campus in Richmond, Virginia, and provided news about the hospital, the Richmond area, and the end of the war.  One of the regular features of Heads Up was the cartoons of M. A. Dunning. Twenty-three of Dunning’s original drawings are located in the Margaret Ethel Kelley Kern papers (LVA acc. 23481).

By the time his work began appearing in Heads Up, M. A. (Marshall Alston) Dunning already had a successful career in cartooning. Born 28 July 1894 in Crystal Springs, Mississippi, Dunning … read more »

The Library of Virginia Releases Virginia Tech Review Panel Records

Handwritten notes from Second Public Meeting of Virginia Tech Review Panel, dated 21 May 2007, by Phil Schaenman, Virginia Tech Review Panel staff director, Records of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, Series II. Files of TriData, Subseries C.1. Files of Phil Schaenman, Box 16, Folder 4, Accession 51144, State Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

The Library of Virginia has completed processing the records of the Virginia Tech Review Panel, 2007-2009 (bulk 2007) (accession 51144) and they are open to researchers. This collection documents Virginia’s official investigation into the 16 April 2007 mass shooting at Virginia Tech. Included are the records of individual panel members, Seung Hui Cho’s educational records from Fairfax County and Virginia Tech as well as his Virginia Tech medical records, interview notes, chapter drafts of Mass Shootings at Virginia Tech, April 16, 2007: Report of the Virginia Tech Review Panel presented to Governor Kaine, August 2007, and addendums to the report compiled in November and December 2009. This is a hybrid collection with paper records available in the Library’s Archives Research Room during normal business hours. The Virginia Tech Review Panel emails are accessible online via Digitool under State Archives Collections. Researchers are strongly encouraged to read the email Tip Sheets before using the collection.

On 16 April 2007, Seung Hui Cho killed 32 people and injured at least 17 others before turning the gun on himself. The massacre at Virginia Tech is one of the deadliest shooting incidents by a single gunman in United States history. On 19 April 2007, Virginia Governor Tim Kaine commissioned the Virginia Tech Review Panel “to conduct an independent, thorough, and objective incident review of the tragedy at Virginia … read more »

Jailing the Jerkers

Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church, Rockbridge County, National Register Nomination, Virginia Dept. of Historic Resources, http://www.dhr.virginia.gov/registers/Counties/Rockbridge/TimberRidgePresChurch_photo.htm, accessed 20 June 2017.

Editor’s Note: The Library of Virginia, in partnership with the
Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, sponsored four residential fellows for the 2016-2017 academic year to conduct in-depth research in the Library’s collections. Doug Winiarski, Religious Studies professor at the University of Richmond, spent the spring semester researching and writing Shakers, Jerkers & the Shawnee Prophet: Religious Encounters on the Early American Frontier, 1805-1815.

Samuel Houston probably scoffed at the legal proceedings against him as he stood before the bar in the Lexington, Virginia, courthouse on 6 August 1805. How could his peers on the grand jury take this case of assault and battery seriously? After all, he was one of the most prominent men in the Rockbridge County: a decorated Revolutionary War officer, a wealthy planter, and a slaveholder. Most important, Houston was a devoted member and patron of the Timber Ridge Presbyterian Church, the handsome stone edifice that stood only a few yards from his imposing log house.

The charges against Houston stemmed from a bizarre new religious phenomenon known as “the jerks”: involuntary convulsions, in which the subjects’ heads lashed violently backward and forward in quick succession like a “flail in the hands of a thresher.” The strange bodily fits erupted unexpectedly during the Great Revival (1799–1805), the powerful succession of Presbyterian sacramental festivals and Methodist camp meetings that … read more »

Virginians in the Great War: Harry Anderson Matthews (1894-1918)

Photograph of Harry Anderson Matthews (1894-1918), Questionnaire, Virginia War History Commission, Series I. Individual Service Records (Questionnaires), box 17, Accession 37219, State Government Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

This is the latest entry in a series of blog posts spotlighting stories and records of Virginia’s involvement in World War I. Corporal Harry A. Matthews, the subject of this week’s post, died on 5 December 1918 from wounds he received during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive on 11 November. Matthews’s sparse World War I Questionnaire tells a sad story of love and loss.

Harry Anderson Matthews (1894-1918), Questionnaire, Virginia War History Commission, Series I. Individual Service Records (Questionnaires), box 17, Accession 37219, State Government Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

Harry Anderson Matthews was born on 8 December 1894 in Richmond, Virginia, to Harry Lee Matthews (1868-1925), a general contractor, and Minnie Pohle (1870-1951). The Matthews family had at least eight children: Hudson W. Matthews (1893-1924), Henry A. Matthews (1894-1918), Irving Lee Matthews (1898-1967), Linwood C. Matthews (1901-1965), Marie Matthews (1905-1969), Herbert T. Matthews (1906-1967), Audrey L. Matthews (1906-1994), and William A. Matthews (1909-1910). When the United States entered the war in April 1917, Matthews worked for his father as a building foreman. On 19 January 1918, Matthews married Adelia Charlotte Howland (1899-1982). He was inducted into the army on 27 May 1918 and left for Europe on 6 August 1918. His daughter, Marjorie, was born thirteen days later.

Matthews served in the 164th Machine Gun Company, 26th Infantry Division. His unit fought in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, a 47 day (26 September to 11 November 1918) American offensive along a twenty-four mile front from the Argonne Forest to the Meuse River. … read more »