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About: Roger

Roger has worked at the Library of Virginia since 1997 and currently works in the state records section. Roger has a Master of Arts degree in Public History from the University of South Carolina. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in History from Millersville University.

Author Archives Roger

Library Makes New Batch of Emails from Governor Timothy M. Kaine Administration Available Online

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the release of 100,343 emails from the administration of Governor Timothy M. Kaine (2006-2010). This latest batch comprises emails from individuals in the offices of Kaine’s Secretary of Health and Human Resources, Secretary of Finance, Secretary of Transportation, and Secretary of Agriculture and Forestry. Included are the email boxes of Connie Biggs, Robert Bloxom, Richard “Ric” Brown, Craig Burns, Heidi Dix, Nicholas Donohue, Manju Ganeriwala, Alleyn Harned, Gail Jaspen, Aryana Khalid, Barbara Reese, Marilyn Tavenner, Michael Tutor, and Jody Wagner. Since January 2014, the Library has made 283,901 emails from the Kaine administration freely available online to the public.



Secretary of Health and Human Resources Marilyn Tavenner (2006-2010)

The Secretary of Health and Human Resources release covers a wide variety of subjects including: state agency budget reductions, implementation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), For Keeps (First Lady Anne Holton’s foster care initiative), State Children’s Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), Family Access to Medical Insurance Security (FAMIS), Governor’s Working Group on Early Childhood Initiatives, Virginia Tech shooting, Virginia Information Technology Agency/Northrup Grumman (VITA/NG) performance issues and costs, No Wrong Door and Senior Navigator initiatives, and the restaurant smoking ban. The archived website and Cabinet Weekly Reports of the Secretary of Health and Human Resources provide additional information on its activities.

Library Makes New Batch of Emails from Governor Timothy M. Kaine Administration Available Online


Virginia Secetary of Education Dr. Thomas Morris (2006-2010)

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the release of 26,988 emails from the administration of Gov. Timothy M. Kaine (2006-2010). This latest batch comprises emails from individuals in the office of Kaine’s Secretary of Education. Included are the email boxes of Thomas Morris, Judith Heiman, Dietra Trent, Douglas Garcia, Jean Bankos, Kathy Glazer, Kendall Tyree, June Hines, Lorraine Lintecum, and Nicholas Galvin. Since January 2014, the Library has made 183,558 emails from the Kaine administration freely available online to the public.

This release is the first to use artificial intelligence to aid in classifying public records. The specific technology applied to the Secretary of Education’s email is known as Continuous Active Learning™, a method of machine learning developed by Gordon V. Cormack and Maura R. Grossman, professors in the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science at the University of Waterloo. Cormack and Grossman have been collaborating with the Library of Virginia since 2015, when they used the initial release of email from Governor Kaine’s administration as a benchmark for evaluation at TREC, the Text REtrieval Conference Conference, organized by the National Institute of Technology (NIST). Look for more details on the Library’s experimentation with artificial intelligence in the forthcoming Fall 2018 issue of Broadside.


Governor's Working Group on Early Childhood Initiatives, 2006-08-17 12:34, Leighty.pst, Email Records from the Office of the Governor (Kaine: 2006-2010), Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA.

The Office of the Secretary of Education assisted the governor in the development and … read more »

Mug Shot Monday: My Hometown Edition


Mugshots of Joseph Winsey, Chester Lewzewski, John Lutz, and William Schmitz, Reading Eagle, 11 March 1919, page 1.

Welcome to Mug Shot Monday! This is the latest entry in a series of posts highlighting inmate photographs in the records of the Virginia Penitentiary. John L. Brown, James L. Davis, Charles C. Williams, and Joseph L. Cary, the subjects of this week’s post, pleaded guilty to robbery in Petersburg in November 1911 and were sentenced to 12 years in the penitentiary. The four first caught my attention while processing the penitentiary records in the early 2000s, when I saw the police from my hometown of Reading, Pennsylvania, wanted them for murder. Ten years later, thanks in part to Google News Archive and Ancestry.com, I am able to tell the story of how their Pennsylvania crime spree, culminating in a senseless murder over apple pies, ended in central Virginia.

On Tuesday, 14 November 1911, A. W. Harman, son of the Virginia state treasurer, arrived at the Byrd Street train station in Richmond at 8:15 pm. As Harman started walking up 8th Street, two men stepped out in front of him. “Both of them pointed revolvers at me,” Harmon later told the Richmond News Leader, “and ordered me to throw up my hands.” When Harman resisted, they struck him on the head with a blunt instrument. Two other men arrived; the four dragged Harman behind some freight cars, stole his watch and $10, and fled … read more »

“The Body of an Infant There and Then Laying Dead”: Infanticide in Coroner’s Inquisitions At The Library of Virginia





Editor’s Note: The Library of Virginia, in partnership with
Virginia Humanities, sponsors residential fellows during the academic year to conduct in-depth research in the Library’s collections. Kristen Green, an independent author whose previous work was Something Must Be Done About Prince Edward County, spent the year researching and writing The Devil’s Half-Acre.

A newborn girl smothered just after birth. A baby girl killed after being struck on the forehead and above the mouth with a brick. An infant boy strangled to death.

All three cases of infanticide were the subject of coroner’s inquisitions in Henrico County in the 1830s and 1840s– and in all three cases, the victims were born to enslaved women and therefore were also enslaved. Virginia law stipulated that the slave status of the babies followed that of their mothers.

When juries were assembled to investigate the three suspicious deaths, each one pointed the finger at the enslaved mother of the baby.

Perusing the Library’s digital collection of inquisitions from around the Commonwealth, I was drawn to these stories of dead babies and the enslaved women investigated for murdering them. Coroner’s inquisitions are county investigations into deaths that are violent, unnatural, or suspicious, and juries are assembled to determine how the person was killed and by whom. The inquisitions, which exist from 1789 to 1942 for Henrico … read more »

Homeland is “creating a heck of a lot of buzz and excitement with our citizens!”



Hugh Dancy, Claire Danes, and Governor McAuliffe, Homeland Reception, 8 September 2017, Executive Mansion, Governor Terry McAuliffe's Flickr page.

Homeland’s season 7 finale aired last Sunday night. Showtime’s critically acclaimed drama stars Claire Danes as CIA Officer Carrie Mathison and Mandy Patinkin as her long-time mentor Saul Berenson. Fox21 Television Studios filmed season 7 on location in Central Virginia from September 2017 to March 2018. Notable locations include the Jefferson Hotel, the State Capitol, the Fan and Northside neighborhoods of Richmond, as well as Hopewell and South Hill. Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe even made a brief nonspeaking cameo in one episode. Incentives from the Virginia Motion Picture Opportunity Fund and the Virginia Motion Picture Tax Credit Fund made production of the series in Virginia possible.


Secretary of Commerce and Trade Haymore, Governor McAuliffe and Andy Edmunds, Homeland Reception, 8 September 2017, Executive Mansion, Governor Terry McAuliffe's Flickr page.

The Virginia Film Office, created in 1980, is part of the Virginia Tourism Corporation. Its mission is increasing “revenue to the state through the production of filmed product including television shows, feature films, videos, documentaries, and commercials.” The Film Office markets Virginia as a location for film and video production, providing financial incentives through grants and tax credits. On 29 June 2017, Rita D. McClenny, President and CEO of the Virginia Tourism Corporation, wrote a memo to Secretary of Commerce and Trade Todd Haymore regarding a request by Homeland’s producers for $9 million (in grants and tax credits) to film in Virginia. McClenny recommended a maximum $700,000 grant from the Virginia Motion Picture Opportunity Fund … read more »

Governor Terry McAuliffe: Building a New Virginia Economy (Web Archive)


Governor Terry McAuliffe skydives to the Virginia Beach Oceanfront on 2 June 2017 as part of the Virginia Beach Patriotic Festival.

Looking for the website of Governor Terry R. McAuliffe (2014-2018), which was taken down at the end of his term? The Library of Virginia can help. The Governor Terry McAuliffe Administration Collection (2014-2018) contains archived versions of the websites of the governor, cabinet, gubernatorial initiatives, lieutenant governor, and attorney general, as well as snapshots of their social media accounts (Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook). These sites are preserved as part of the Library of Virginia’s web archiving program.


Governor Terry McAuliffe becomes the first governor to fly in an autonomous aircraft, 18 May 2017, NASA Wallops Flight Facility.

The McAuliffe Administration web archive enables researchers to access the governor’s executive orders and directives, press releases, First Lady Dorothy McAuliffe’s No Hunger Campaign, and the Governor’s Top 5: This Week in the New Virginia Economy, a weekly compilation of the activities and achievements of the administration. The collection also contains the websites of Lt. Governor Ralph S. Northam and Attorney General Mark R. Herring.

Since 2005, the Library’s web archiving program has captured websites of enduring cultural value, especially those created and maintained by Virginia government. The collection includes the websites of the administrations of Governor Mark Warner (2002-2006), Tim Kaine (2006-2010), and Robert McDonnell (2010-2014) as well as Virginia state agency sites. We have also expanded into special topics of Virginia interest, such as the 2006 Senate race between George Allen and Jim Webb and the 2007 Virginia Tech … read more »

“Objection, Mr. Chairman!” – The Opening Session of the 1998 House of Delegates


The 1998 House of Delegates, Library of Virginia Special Collections, Prints & Photographs.

With the Virginia House of Delegates almost evenly divided between Republicans and Democrats when it convenes on Wednesday, 10 January 2018, Out of the Box decided to spotlight Library of Virginia records related to that last time the chamber was tied in 1998. A recent Washington Post article described the 14 January 1998 opening session of the House of Delegates as an “ugly spectacle.” The Richmond Times-Dispatch called it a “parliamentary WrestleMania.” You can now see for yourself. The Library has added video of a portion of this session to our YouTube Channel. The video is part of the recordings of the Virginia House of Delegates sessions, 1982-2011 (accession 50627) housed at the Library.

After the 1997 general election, the Democrats held a 51-48 majority in the House of Delegates with one independent. Republican Governor-elect James Gilmore (1998-2002) appointed two state senators, Joseph B. Benedetti (R) and Charles L. Waddell (D) and one Democratic delegate, David G. Brickley to positions in his administration. The appointments set off a chain-reaction of House and Senate special elections which culminated in the Republicans gaining one additional house seat. With independent delegate Lacey E. Putney agreeing to caucus with Republicans, the chamber would be tied when the session began. However, the State Board of Elections refused to accelerate certification of the Republican delegates elected in three 13 January … read more »

Taking Office: Inaugurations of Virginia’s Governors, 1942-2010


Lt. Governor-elect Ralph S. Northam and former President Bill Clinton, Inauguration Day, 11 January 2014. Photo taken by Michaele White, Visual Arts Coordinator, Office of the Governor.

Every four years, on the Saturday after the second Wednesday in January, Virginia’s three highest elected officials ­- the governor, the lieutenant governor, and the attorney general – are inaugurated. On Saturday 13 January 2018 at noon, Ralph S. Northam will be inaugurated as Virginia’s 73rd Governor. The oath of office also will be administered to Justin E. Fairfax as Lieutenant Governor, and Mark R. Herring as Attorney General. Witnessing the event will be both houses of the General Assembly, a large company of invited guests, and members of the news media. In a ceremony that has not changed significantly since the 1930s, the new governor and his colleagues will take an oath of office to support and defend the state’s constitution and execute the laws of the Commonwealth. To spotlight inaugural records in the collections of the Library of Virginia, we created a new Google Arts & Culture exhibit: Taking Office: Inaugurations of Virginia’s Governors, 1942-2010.

Based on a 2001-2002 exhibit in the Library’s lobby, Taking Office includes inaugural ephemera (tickets, passes, invitations, souvenirs) and photographs. Also included are some videos and WRVA radio broadcasts not included in the original exhibit. For an additional photographic sampling of past inaugurations, visit the small exhibition in the lobby of the Library of Virginia through the end of January 2018.  Inauguration day marks the … read more »

Opportunity Time: The Records of Virginia Governor Linwood Holton


Inauguration of Governor Linwood Holton, 17 January 1970, A. Linwood Holton Papers, 1943-1970. Accession 31535, Personal papers collection, Library of Virginia.

On Monday, 16 October 2017, the City of Roanoke will dedicate Holton Plaza, a new park named in honor of former Virginia Governor A. Linwood Holton (1970-1974). Out of the Box thought this would be a good time to spotlight some of the Library’s collections related to Holton.

Abner Linwood Holton Jr. was born 21 September 1923 in Roanoke, Virginia, to Abner Linwood Holton and Edith Van Gorder Holton. He attended local schools, before receiving his B.A. from Washington and Lee University in 1944. Holton served in the United States Navy from 1943 to 1946. He then attended Harvard Law School, receiving his LL.B. in 1949. Admitted to the Virginia bar that same year, Holton commenced practicing in Roanoke and became active in the Virginia Republican Party. Following an unsuccessful bid for governor in 1965, Holton then won election in 1969, serving as governor of Virginia from 1970 to 1974. After his term ended, he served as assistant secretary of state for congressional relations in 1974. Holton resigned that position and practiced law in Washington D.C. He married Virginia “Jinx” Harrison Rogers on 10 January 1953, and had four children with her: Anne, Tayloe, Woody, and Dwight.



Opportunity Time: A Memoir by Governor Linwood Holton, The University of Virginia Press, 2008.

Gubernatorial Records

  • The records of the Holton administration (1970-1974) are one of the largest 20th century gubernatorial collections held by the Library. Housed in
  • read more »

Antiguo Dominio: The Virginia Latino Advisory Board


Governor Robert F. McDonnell signs Hispanic and Latino Heritage Month proclamation, Executive Mansion, Richmond, Virginia, 6 October 2010, Press Office, Governor Robert McDonnell Administration (2010-2014).

Latinos and Hispanics have roots in Virginia dating back five centuries. In honor of Hispanic and Latino Heritage Month in Virginia (15 September to 15 October), Out of the Box is spotlighting the Virginia Latino Advisory Board (VLAB) and related records at the Library of Virginia.

On 7 October 2003, Governor Mark R. Warner (2002-2006) issued Executive Order 57 creating the Virginia Latino Advisory Commission (VLAC) to provide the administration with information about the growing Latino community in the Commonwealth. “One of the things that makes [sic] Virginia special is the rich diversity of its people, and my administration views our diversity as a source of strength,” Governor Warner said in a press release. “Our diverse and growing population of Virginians of Latino descent presents new opportunities for the Commonwealth, and the members of this new Commission bring a wide variety of professional, cultural, and entrepreneurial experience, as well as extensive records of community leadership.” The Virginia General Assembly passed legislation in 2005 turning the VLAC into a permanent board.

Renamed the Virginia Latino Advisory Board, the board has the power to:

  • Advise the Governor regarding the development of economic, professional, cultural, educational, and governmental links between the Commonwealth of Virginia, the Latino community in Virginia, and Latin America;
  • Undertake studies, symposiums, research, and factual reports to gather information to formulate and present recommendations
  • read more »