Category Archives: State Records Blog Posts

- Man at the Top: The Kaine Administration Cabinet Week Reports Collection

Kaine Cabinet Weekly Reports, 2009-07-31, Secretary of Natural Resources (2009-07-30), page one, Timothy M. Kaine Administration (2006-2010) Cabinet Weekly Reports Digital Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce a new digital collection:  the Kaine Administration Cabinet Weekly Reports Collection (2006-2009). Accessible through Digitool (and linked to from the “Related Content” section of the Kaine Email Project @ LVA page), this collection consists of weekly reports submitted to Governor Tim Kaine by the governor’s cabinet members, advisors, policy, press, and constituent services offices, and the Virginia Liaison Office. Reports were submitted each Thursday and placed in a binder for the governor that he took with him at the end of the day on Friday. While the level of detail varies, each report contains information on legislation, Governor’s initiatives and special projects, agency matters and operations, events and agency visits, audits or investigations, stakeholder issues, and pending decisions. This collection, which is full-text searchable, provides a weekly account of the issues and policy decisions of the Kaine Administration.

The weekly reports address a wide variety of issues and topics including:  avian flu, state budgets, the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC), renovations of the Capitol, creation of a Civil Rights Memorial, early childhood education, planning for the 2008 presidential election and the January 2009 inauguration of President Barack Obama, land conservation, minority procurement, transportation, federal recognition of Virginia’s Native American tribes, IT issues, and workforce development.

Kaine Cabinet Weekly Reports, 2009-08-07, Secretary of Natural Resources (2009-08-06), page one, Timothy M. Kaine Administration (2006-2010) Cabinet Weekly Reports Digital Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

Governor Kaine often … read more »

- All I’m Thinkin’ About….Tim Kaine Records at the Library of Virginia

Tim Kaine takes the oath of office from Virginia Supreme Court Justice Leroy R. Hassell, Jr., Williamsburg, 14 January 2006, Office of the Governor.

Long time readers of Out of the Box are already familiar with the Kaine Email Project @ LVA. Hillary Clinton’s selection of Virginia Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate has brought national attention to our little project. Recent stories in Politico, Washington Post and the New York Times have all made use of the Kaine email collection. With this new interest in Kaine, we thought it would be a good time to spotlight the Library’s collection about Kaine and how to access them.

Kaine Email Project @ LVA – Digital

The Kaine Email Project provides online access to the email records from the administration of Governor Timothy M. Kaine, Virginia’s 70th governor (2006-2010). We are processing and releasing these records in batches.  To date, we have released over 145,000 emails from 66 Kaine staff members. The “By the Numbers” document shows what we are currently working on. New releases will be announced on this blog and via the Library’s Twitter and Facebook pages. Before jumping in to the collection, we strongly suggest you read the collection finding aid and the tip sheets we created to help users search the collection.

Governor Tim Kaine standing in front of the Shenandoah River, Shenandoah Valley Cabinet Community Day, 17 October 2006, Office of the Governor.

Governor Timothy M. Kaine Web Archive Collection, 2006-2010 – Digital

The web archive of the Administration of Governor Tim Kaine (2006-2010) contains archived versions of Web sites for the Governor’s Office, … read more »

- Miami Beach Florida is Calling You

In November 1924, Governor E. Lee Trinkle traveled to Florida to attend the annual Governors’ Conference. The Governors’ Conference was held in Jacksonville, Florida, on 17-18 November 1924, after which Conference members traveled to other cities including Orlando, Tampa, St. Petersburg, West Palm Beach, Cocoa, and Miami. Governor Trinkle must have obtained this travel brochure while in Miami, and it was kept with his notes and travel expense records for the Governors’ Conference. The travel brochure has some beautiful brightly colored images of the wonders of Miami—from its beaches and polo matches, to swimming and golf. There is also a page with suggestions on how to get to Miami, advertising its accessibility by rail, boat, and auto. The travel brochure contains such beautiful imagery that we thought it would be fun to share this iconic 1920s artwork with you. To read more about travel brochures in the LVA’s collections, check out the latest edition of the Broadside or the recently posted digital collection.

-Renee Savits, State Records Archivist… read more »

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- Ten Paces! Fire!

On 28 November 1818, John McCarty of Loudoun County wrote a short letter to the Speaker of the House of Delegates of Virginia, declining the seat he had recently been elected to in that body. The reason? Since his election, he had accepted a challenge from his cousin, U. S. Senator Armistead T. Mason, and would therefore be unable to take the required oath against dueling.


Arising from the practices of European nobility, for many years dueling was a surprisingly frequent occurrence in American life—and politics. In a society pervaded by ideas of honor and reputation, disputes that started in the political realm quickly turned personal, and it was far from rare for politicians to engage in so-called “affairs of honor;” the Hamilton-Burr duel is only one of the most famous examples.

Politics were also at the root of the disagreement between John Mason McCarty and his cousin, Armistead Thompson Mason. The two men already had an acrimonious political relationship, stemming from a contentious election where McCarty supported Federalist Charles Fenton Mercer over the Democratic-Republican Mason for a seat in the House of Representatives. Although Mason was selected to serve in the U. S. Senate, McCarty and Mason continued to take potshots at each other in the press, publishing numerous letters in the Leesburg newspaper The Genius of Liberty. In May 1818, the … read more »

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- Truckin’ with the Bill of Rights

Editor’s Note: This post originally appeared in The Delimiter, the Library’s in-house on-line newsletter. It has been slightly edited for clarity.

To commemorate the bicentennial of the Bill of Rights, Philip Morris wanted to finance a major tour of an original copy of the document– the basis for many of our basic freedoms and rights. As the repository of Virginia’s copy of the Bill of Rights, The Virginia State Library and Archives (now the Library of Virginia) was approached and agreed to its use.

Philip Morris funded restoration work on the document and financed the fabrication of both an elaborate traveling case, as well as a display case. Both cases had advanced climatic control and were designed to protect this precious document from any potential harm. In addition to the immediate housing for the document, the design of the display system guaranteed crowd control, as well as allowing adequate viewing of the document by visitors wishing to see the Bill of Rights.

The tour consisted of a 52 city, 50 state tour, commencing in Barre, VT, on 10 October 1990 and winding up with the document’s return home to Richmond on 11 December 1991 (with a grand total of 26,000 miles traveled), culminating in a fundraising dinner and closing of the exhibition on 15 December. The tour was planned to ensure that weather conditions … read more »

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- Painting the Town “Light Drab”

Image /WF/12/02/023 from the 1939 World's Fair Virginia Room Photograph Collection

While processing Governor E. Lee Trinkle’s Executive Papers, 1922-1926, I came across several folders relating to the Governor’s Mansion in Richmond, Virginia. One folder held several paint samples that were likely used to decorate the mansion. One sample of cream paint is marked “Entrance all,” while another color, light drab, is marked “State reception room.” It is worth noting that on 4 January 1926, Governor E. Lee Trinkle’s 5 year old son, Billy, accidently set a Christmas tree alight with a sparkler and caused a fire at the mansion. It is unknown if these color samples were used to repaint the Mansion after the fire or if they were used to repaint the mansion when the family first moved in after Trinkle’s inauguration in 1922. Either way it is interesting to see what colors were chosen to paint the mansion during Governor Trinkle’s term.

-Renee Savits, State Records Archivist… read more »

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- Library Makes New Batch of Emails from Governor Timothy M. Kaine Administration Available Online

Secretary of Public Safety John Marshall (2002-2010)

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce the release of 6,745 emails from the administration of Governor Timothy M. Kaine (2006-2010). This latest batch comprises emails from individuals in Kaine’s Secretary of Public Safety office. Included are the email boxes of John Marshall, Clyde Cristman, Marilyn Harris, Dawn Smith and Erin Bryant.  Since January 2014, the Library has made 145,605 emails from the Kaine administration freely available online to the public.

Follow up, 2009-12-28 21:38, KaineLibjmarshall.pst, Email Records from the Office of the Governor (Kaine: 2006-2010), Library of Virginia, Richmond, VA.

The Office of the Secretary of Public Safety focused on a variety of subjects including: tracking legislation; stimulus funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009; the 16 April 2007 shooting at Virginia Tech; the creation of a public safety memorial; minority procurement; the work of the Governor’s Office for Substance Abuse Prevention (GOSAP); and planning for Queen Elizabeth II’s 2007 visit to Virginia.  For the complete picture, you will need to jump into the collection and start digging.

The Library of Virginia’s Kaine Email Project makes the email records from the administration of Governor Timothy M. Kaine, Virginia’s 70th governor (2006–2010), accessible online. Users can search and view email records from the Governor’s Office and his cabinet secretaries; learn about other public records from the Kaine Administration; go behind the scenes to see how the Library of Virginia made the email records available; and read what read more »

- May the 4th Be With You

Even government officials have to let loose sometimes. Happy Star Wars Day from your Out of the Box editors and the Kaine email project!


FW: Presidential Ask, 2008-10-30 18:25, KaineLibjcorbin.pst, Email Records from the Office of the Governor (Kaine: 2006-2010), State Records Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va. (cropped)

FW: Presidential Ask, 2008-10-30 19:06, KaineLibjcorbin.pst, Email Records from the Office of the Governor (Kaine: 2006-2010), State Records Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va. (cropped) read more »

Also posted in Kaine Email Project
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- First Freedom: The Great Sabbath Debate, Part 1

 Broadside, Sabbath Breakers, London, William Miller, 1671. Houghton Library, Harvard University. Source: WikiCommons.

The passage of the Statute for Religious Freedom by the General Assembly in 1786 guaranteed religious freedom to people of all faiths. However, Quakers, Mennonites, Jews, and other religious minorities continued to have concerns about worshiping freely. Their religious beliefs and practices did not conform to the mainstream Protestant beliefs and cultural customs of the day. They felt it necessary to file petitions with the General Assembly in an attempt to safeguard their religious practices.

The topic of the petitions could be something seemingly mundane as with one filed by Quakers from Surry County seeking permission to keep their hats on when greeting another person. They believed the custom of removing one’s hat to greet someone “originated in pride and superstition and that it [hat removal] is a mark of honor due only to the Supreme Being.” Other petitions were more controversial such as ones filed by a group of Quakers, Mennonites, Dunkards, and Tunkers asking to be exempted from military duty on religious grounds.

Some petitions filed by religious minorities were more easily accommodated than others. One religious tenet that proved difficult to accommodate was observance of the Sabbath. On 26 December 1792, the General Assembly passed a law entitled “An act for the effectual suppression of vice, and punishing the disturbers of religious worship, and Sabbath Breakers.” The portion of the act related … read more »

Also posted in Exhibitions
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- Forsaken: The Digital Bibliography


In his debut novel, Forsaken, Ross Howell Jr. tells the story of an uneducated African American servant, Virginia Christian, who was tried for killing her white employer in 1912. She died in the electric chair one day after her 17th birthday, the only female juvenile executed in Virginia since 1908. Howell researched the case using a variety of documents and images related to Christian’s execution found in the Library of Virginia’s collections.

The Library of Virginia is pleased to announce a new digital exhibition, Forsaken: The Digital Bibliography, which spotlights the court records and newspaper stories used and referenced in the novel. Included are:  the coroner’s inquest for Ida V. Belote; Virginia Christian’s trial, appeal, and clemency records; and newspaper coverage of these events from the Newport News Times-Herald and Daily Press.

As noted at the beginning of the novel, Forsaken is a work of fiction, but many of the characters were real people. Forsaken: The Digital Bibliography includes brief biographical sketches and documents related to these individuals. Also included is additional background material on other historic events referenced in the text, such as Nat Turner’s Rebellion and the “Allen Gang.” The epilogue focuses on what happened to the real-life main characters: Charles Mears, Harriet and Sadie Belote, Charles Pace, and others.

While by no means comprehensive (and very much … read more »