Category Archives: Uncategorized

- A Few of Our Favorite Things: Letterhead in the Archive Part 4


Governor Pollard Executive Papers, 1930


It’s been a while, but as promised in a previous post, here’s another look at some of the plethora of letterheads and stationery found in our archives.  The original text by Vince Brooks is included here for context.

 

Commercial stationery can offer a fascinating snapshot of a place or time. Scholars of this subject point out that the rich illustrations and elaborate printing of commercial letterheads, billheads, and envelopes correspond with the dramatic rise in industrialization in America. According to one expert, the period 1860 to 1920 represents the heyday of commercial stationery, when Americans could see their growing nation reflected in the artwork on their bills and correspondence. As commercial artists influenced the job printing profession, the illustrations became more detailed and creative.

Robert Biggert, an authority on commercial stationery, wrote an extensive study of letterhead design for the Ephemera Society of America entitled “Architectural Vignettes on Commercial Stationery” and donated his personal collection of stationery, now known as the Biggert Collection, to the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University.

The primary role of these illustrations at the time of their use was publicity. The images showed bustling factories, busy street corners, and sturdy bank buildings–all portraying ideas of solidity, activity, and progress. Other types of symbolism can be found in commercial stationery, the most … read more »

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- Hampton Roads Group Features Kaine Emails in Open Government “Hack-a-Thon”

Editor’s Note:  This article first appeared in the July 2015 Library of Virginia Newsletter.


Governor Kaine attending launch of the Virginia Higher Education Wizard, Virginia State Police Headquarters, Richmond, 11 March 2009, Office of the Governor (Kaine : 2006-2010), State Records Collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Va.

One of the Library of Virginia’s newest online collections was recently hacked, and we could not be more excited. The Kaine Email Project has caught the attention of a group of civic hackers called Code for Hampton Roads. As the local chapter of the Code for America Brigade, Code for Hampton Roads provides opportunities for people to marry technological skills with a desire to foster open government and improve communities through open-source web solutions. The group’s recent projects include web apps for finding local restaurants’ health inspection results and for searching all of Virginia’s civil court records from a single search page.


@StanZheng explaining his work on the Governor's Emails project #NDoCH2015 #Code4HR, 6 June 2015, photo from Code for Hampton Roads Twitter feed, https://twitter.com/code4hr (accessed 7 July 2015).

In the case of the Kaine Email Project, on 6 June 2015, hackers got a chance to tackle this massive data set (currently composed of more than 130,000 processed records) as part of the third annual National Day of Civic Hacking. The hackers’ goal was to devise new entry points for researching the collection, such as visualizations of topic frequency in Kaine administration email discussions or maps showing which correspondents interacted with each other the most. An immediate output of the hack-a-thon was a “word cloud” of the most common terms used in the set of emails currently available for public viewing. A word-cloud generator … read more »

- From Small Things (Big Things One Day Come): Five Years of Out of the Box

Anniversaries have been a theme in recent entries on Out of the Box. Today’s post is no exception.  May 14 is the 5th anniversary of our blog!  Our first post spotlighted a Where History Begins workshop held for Virginia’s local historical societies at the Library.  Three hundred eighty-seven posts later we are still going strong.

Out of the Box wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for the work of former LVA Local Records Archivist Dale Dulaney.  Dale’s enthusiasm and determination, with a big assist from Jason Roma, the Library’s web developer, turned his idea into reality.

In his second blog post, Dale encouraged our readers to “visit often.”  Visit you have!  The numbers speak for themselves.

Fiscal Year (July to June)

Visits[1]

Views[2]

FY 2010

4,069

4,942

FY 2011

81,076

88,746

FY 2012

185,293

225,702

FY 2013

385,256

461,541

FY 2014

743,590

962,758

FY 2015 (thru March)

1,076,433

1,402,246

Dale also asked our readers to “make comments” and “share your stories.”  One great example of reader participation is the response to Jessica Tyree’s post on the Leona Robbins Fitchett Collection (Acc. 50068).  Fitchett donated her childhood letters received from pen-pals from Carbrooke Junior School in Thetford, Norfolk, England.  Jessica’s post brought together Fitchett with the son of her World War II pen-pal and forged new friendships.

The editors … read more »

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- The Sinking of the Lusitania: 100 Years Later

Today marks the centennial of the sinking of the Lusitania, usually acknowledged as the first step towards the United States’ entry into World War I. The Lusitania was torpedoed by a German U-boat off the coast of Ireland on 7 May 1915, causing the deaths of 1,198 passengers and crew. The death toll included 128 Americans, sparking outrage throughout the nation.

One of the survivors was Richmond native Charles Hill, who was 38 at the time of the sinking. Hill, who worked for the British-American Tobacco Company, had been living in England with his family for almost fifteen years. He returned periodically to Richmond to visit his father, C. Emmett Hill. In April, Hill, his wife Eva, and their children returned to the U.S. for the sake of her health, travelling on the Lusitania. On 1 May, Hill reboarded the Lusitania in New York, bound for Liverpool with almost two thousand other passengers and crew members.

Hill was on the starboard promenade deck of the Lusitania when it was struck, and saw both the periscope of German submarine U-20 and the wake of the torpedo. After rushing below decks in an unsuccessful attempt to find several friends, Hill returned deck and made it into lifeboat number 14, which over the course of the afternoon capsized six times. Hill clung to the lifeboat with several other … read more »

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- There Are No Small Preventions, Only Smallpox

Before the Commonwealth of Virginia began officially recording vital statistics in 1853, many people recorded the births, deaths, and marriages in their families in the pages of their family bibles. The Library of Virginia has in its collection thousands of such bible records, which provide precious information, frequently recorded nowhere else, to researchers of family history.

The Needham family of York County recorded many births, deaths, and marriages in their family bible, including the births of seven children between 1774 and 1791. They chose, however, to include an unusual piece of medical information. Directly under the list of births there is a notation reading, “1792 November the above children wear anockerlated with the smallpox.” The inoculation of their six living children against smallpox– one of whom was less than a year old – was clearly of great importance to the Needhams. Having already lost an infant child, whose cause of death is not recorded, the Needhams likely wanted to protect their living children from at least one of the deadly diseases that killed so many in the 18th century.

Smallpox had long been a scourge in North America, from the epidemic in New England in the 1630s, which killed a significant percentage of the Native American population, to the continent-wide outbreak from 1775 to 1782. Smallpox, caused by the variola major virus, was likely … read more »

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- “Straight to the Source” conference coming to the Library of Virginia


Photographs found in Montgomery County chancery cause 1925-002, Florence S. Casper vs. John J. Casper alias J.J. Cosmato, processed as part of the Montgomery County Chancery Project. Learn more during Sarah Nerney's presentation at the Straight to the Source conference, 27 March 2015.

We are excited to announce that the Friends of the Virginia State Archives 23rd Annual Spring Conference will be held at the Library of Virginia on Friday, 27 March 2015. This year’s theme, “Straight to the Source,” will be explored in presentations by four knowledgeable LVA staffers.

The conference will kick off with an expert guide to perhaps the Library of Virginia’s most powerful resource—its website. With layer after layer of unique and fascinating material, it can be easy to miss some of the site’s offerings. Digital Initiatives & Web Services Manager Kathy Jordan will give attendees a tour that will hit all of the highlights and equip them for “web wise” independent navigation.

For those researching Revolutionary War-era ancestors, the Library has no shortage of information waiting to be accessed. Archives Reference Coordinator Minor Weisiger will guide listeners to an array of useful tools, from compiled service records, pensions, and bounty warrants, to lesser-known resources including naval records, Auditor’s Office records, legislative petitions, Continental Congress papers, the Draper Manuscripts, the online George Rogers Clark papers database, and miscellaneous personal papers collections.

Regular readers of Out of the Box may already have heard of two big projects that the Library is proud to support, both of which will be discussed at the conference. The Montgomery County Chancery Project, funded in large part by an NHPRC grant, is nearing the … read more »

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- Love Hurts, Ooooooooo, Oooooo, Love Hurts.


Vintage Valentine's Day card, Ephemera collection, Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

While working on a project involving the Middlesex County Chancery Causes, I noticed a case that was filled with scandal and intrigue.  The case is a divorce suit, Middlesex Chancery Cause 1907-033, Andrew Courtney vs. Mary Courtney.  In the suit, both parties accuse the other of adultery.  Andrew claimed his wife ran off to Connecticut with a married man named Beverly Smith.  Mary claimed Andrew was guilty of adultery himself.

She produced as evidence several letters written to her husband by various women, one of which included a lock of hair.  That letter, dated 30 August 1906 from a Miss Ginny Davis, proclaimed “Here is a peice [sic] of my hair look at it and think of me.”

While it is sad to think that some of the love letters that end up in the archives are the result of divorce suits and romance gone wrong in one way or another, it also proves the quest for love is something that is surely timeless.

The Middlesex Chancery Causes, including the above-referenced lock of hair, are available online through the Chancery Records Index on the Library of Virginia’s Virginia Memory site. They are part of the growing list of chancery causes from various localities that have been digitally reformatted and made available through the innovative Circuit Court Records Preservation Program (CCRP), a cooperative program … read more »

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- The Island Formerly Known as 314


Richard Young, A Plan of the City of Richmond, Detail, 1809.

This summer’s announcement that Mayo’s Island is again for sale prompted a look back at the history of of the most well-known of the James River islands.

Mayo’s Island is located at degrees 37˚31’45.47”N, 77˚25’59.14”W and can easily be viewed through Google Earth. The U.S. Board on Geographic Names officially registered “Mayo’s Island” as a feature name in 1979. The name also appears on earlier maps and atlases of Richmond, including the Beers (1877) and Baist (1889) atlases. Going back even further, the land mass was unnamed on the Young (1809) and Baist (1835) maps of Richmond, identified only as number “314.” An untitled manuscript map of the city drawn circa 1838 merely labels the island as “Toll Gate,” and an 1873 office map of Richmond identifies present-day Mayo’s Island as two islands: Long Island and Confluence Island.

Plats and certificates from the late 18th and early 19th centuries are extant and they reveal that the islands were commonly known as Long and Confluence Islands; parcels of land were granted by the Virginia Land Office to John Mayo (Long Island) in 1792 and to Thomas Burfoot and Milton Clarke (Confluence Island) in 1830. Mayo had petitioned the General Assembly in November 1784 to build a bridge at his own expense and desired to levy a toll to recoup his costs. While John Mayo never saw his … read more »

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- To Be Sold: Beasley, Jones, and Wood- Virginia Slave Traders


Principal Slave Trading Routes, 1810-1850 ca. Provide in part by Calvin Schermerhorn and the University of Richmond Digital Scholarship Lab.

This is the third in a series of four blogs related to the “To Be Sold” exhibit which opens on October 27 at the Library of Virginia. Each post will be based on court cases found in LVA’s Local Records collection and involving slave traders. These suits provide insight into the motivation of individuals to get into the slave trading business, as well as details on how they carried out their operations. Even more remarkably, these records document stories of enslaved individuals purchased in Virginia and taken hundreds of miles away by sea and by land to be sold in the Deep South. The following narrative comes from Lunenburg County Chancery Cause 1860-026, Christopher Wood, etc. vs. Executor of William H. Wood.

From 1834 to 1845, Richard R. Beasley and William H. Wood were business partners “engaged in the trade of negroes [sic], buying them here [Virginia] & carrying them to the South for sale.” It was a partnership that was renewed every twelve months. Over the next decade, other individuals such as Robert R. Jones invested in the partnership but Wood and Beasley were the primary participants. The slave trade enterprise was funded by the personal capital of the partners, as well as loans from banks and private individuals. For example, in 1838, Beasley invested $5,800 and Wood $2,343 and they borrowed $6,905 from … read more »

- New Images Added to the Lost Records Digital Collection


Plat of Bell's Cold Comfort Estate, 1840, in Buckingham County found in Nelson County Chancery Causes, 1841-071, The Library of Virginia, Richmond, Virginia.

Additional document images from counties or incorporated cities classified as “Lost Records Localities” have been added to the Lost Records Localities Digital Collection available on Virginia Memory.  The bulk of the additions are copies of wills, deeds, and estate records of members of the Bell family from Buckingham County; these items were used as exhibits in the Nelson County Chancery Cause 1841-071, William Scruggs and wife, etc., versus Rebecca Branch, etc. The wills of Frederick Cabell, Dougald Ferguson, and William Woods–all recorded in Buckingham County and all exhibits in other Nelson County chancery suits–have been added as well. One document from Buckingham County was found in City of Lynchburg court records. It is an apprenticeship indenture dated 1812, made between Clough T. Amos and Betsy Scott, a free African American. Amos was to instruct Scott’s son Wilson “in the art and mystery of a waterman in navigating [the] James river above the falls at the city of Richmond.”

Documents from other Lost Records Localities used as exhibits in Middlesex County chancery suits have been added as well. They include the will of Edward Waller, recorded in Gloucester County; the wills of Patsy Wiatt and James Christian, recorded in King and Queen County; a deed between Henry Cooke and wife to William Taylor, recorded in King and Queen County; and the will and estate … read more »