Category Archives: Uncategorized

- Connect With Us!

Libraries and archives are no longer mere physical spaces. Their presence and influence extends beyond the reading rooms into your Twitter and Facebook feeds, YouTube, and blogs. On November 7, the Library of Virginia will be opening a new exhibit, “Connect with Us,” that explores how the library uses social media to engage and encourage the community.  New acquisitions and unusual items will be displayed and visitors will be encouraged to post comments about the materials and their experiences within the library. Each month throughout the exhibit’s run into February we’ll be featuring a different social media outlet.

Leading up to the exhibit opening we encourage you to connect with us through our various social media outlets: Facebook, @LibraryofVA on Twitter, Flickr, YouTube, Multiple Exposure catablog, and the Out of the Boxblog. On Twitter and Facebook, in addition to our event announcements and collections information, we’ll be highlighting unique collections and having a round of trivia contests. To get you started, here is a quick tour of the Library of Virginia’s internet presence.         

On our YouTube channel you can find an introductory video about our mission and collections; videos “From the Conservation Lab;” videos from our book talk series, featuring authors of works on Virginia subjects and Virginia authors of fiction and nonfiction discussing their research and writing; and … read more »

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- Archives Month 2011 is Here!

 

 ”No people can be deemed masters of their own history until their public records, gathered, cared for, and rendered accessible to the investigator, have been systematically studied and the importance of their contents determined.” — Charles M. Andrews, Historian

Saturday, October 1, marked the official beginning of Archives Month, a nationwide celebration recognizing the critical role that archives and archivists play in preserving the documentary history of the nation. 

Since 2002, Virginia has celebrated those institutions and individuals in the commonwealth that help preserve and make accessible the important records of our actions as citizens, businesses, religious groups, government, and society.  The work of these repositories and individuals give us a sense of being part of a larger picture and helps us begin to see ourselves connected to others — family, community, nation or a group defined by ethnicity, religion, work or play. The result is a sense of belonging, direction and meaning. Far from focusing only on past accomplishments, those who care for our archives and special collections help provide us with a foundation for discussing the things that matter most in our communities today.

Archives Month is a collaborative project of the Library of Virginia, in conjunction with the Virginia State Historical Records Advisory Board, the National Historical Publications and Records Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Archives Conference

This year’s Archives … read more »

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- Maybe we can learn from doodles…

"Registere of James Taylor" and sketches drawn on St. Peter's Parish Records, 1685-1758

Guest contributor Tricia Noel joins us to share an interesting disovery left by an anonymous artist on some New Kent County church records.

Although they can provide valuable genealogical and historical information to researchers, poring over church records can be dull and tedious work. The records of Saint Peter’s Episcopal Church in New Kent County (Accessions 30117, 19729, and 19740), however, are anything but boring. The vestry books and register, which cover 1685-1801, are heavily adorned with drawings and sketches. These drawings, which occupy many of the records’ margins and blank spaces, are mostly amusing depictions of horses, dogs, people, and a building or two. Some drawings of most interest to the historian include several of people with clear depictions of contemporary clothing, including a man in a knee-length, cut away coat, and another in a long, curly wig. The faces were drawn with an attention to expression, and many, with their large noses, huge feet and messy hair, are not flattering. There are a few depictions of symmetical, Colonial style houses. There are several dogs, one of them labelled “Rover,” many horses and deer, and one unknown creature, covered with bristles and with a mouth full of dangerous-looking teeth. Several of the images include odd captions, such as “Give me an apple.” It is not known who the anonymous artist was, but one can … read more »

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- A Few of Our Favorite Things: Letterheads in the Archive Part 2

 

Planters Nut & Chocolate Co. This letterhead is found in Tredegar Iron Works Records (Accession 23881) Series VI: Correspondence, Incoming, 1924, Box 588.

As promised in a previous post, here’s another look at the plethora of letterheads and stationery found in our archives.  The original text by Vince Brooks is included here for context.

Commercial stationery can offer a fascinating snapshot of a place or time. Scholars of this subject point out that the rich illustrations and elaborate printing of commercial letterheads, billheads, and envelopes correspond with the dramatic rise in industrialization in America. According to one expert, the period 1860 to 1920 represents the heyday of commercial stationery, when Americans could see their growing nation reflected in the artwork on their bills and correspondence. As commercial artists influenced the job printing profession, the illustrations became more detailed and creative.

Robert Biggert, an authority on commercial stationery, wrote an extensive study of letterhead design for the Ephemera Society of America entitled “Architectural Vignettes on Commercial Stationery” and donated his personal collection of stationery, now known as the Biggert Collection, to the Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library at Columbia University.

The primary role of these illustrations at the time of their use was publicity. The images showed bustling factories, busy street corners, and sturdy bank buildings–all portraying ideas of solidity, activity, and progress. Other types of symbolism can be found in commercial stationery, the most ubiquitous being “man’s best friend.” Dogs show up … read more »

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- Virginia’s CCRP Program Provides $375,859.32 For Preservation Grants

The Circuit Court Records Preservation Program (CCRP) Grant Review Board met on May 25, 2011, at the Library of Virginia to consider records preservation grant requests from 46 circuit courts across the commonwealth. A total of 54 applications were submitted with requests totaling over $424,000. After careful evaluation and discussion of all applications, the board approved 47 grant projects for $375,859.32.

The CCRP is a part of the Library of Virginia’s Local Records Services Branch. Funded through a $1.50 of the court clerk’s recordation fee, the CCRP provides resources to help preserve and make accessible permanent circuit court records. The program awards grants to the commonwealth’s circuit court clerks to help address the preservation needs of the records housed in their localities. Since 1992, the CCRP has awarded over 1100 preservation grants for more than $15 million dollars. For a full listing of awarded grants, please see the meeting minutes here.

The board is comprised of five members: three circuit court clerks, appointed annually by the president of the Virginia Court Clerks’ Association, and two staff members from the Library of Virginia, currently the State Archivist and the Local Records Program Manager. The review board convenes regularly to evaluate grant applications to award grant funds for processing, conserving, securing, and increasing access to circuit court records. Clerk members of this year’s board were Judy

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- A much-deserved “thanks,” and a reluctant “farewell”

If only the Young Ladies of the Wesleyan Female Institute were here to sing their "Parting Song" for Dale. But alas, all we can offer is a blog post. Image from the cover of sheet music in the collection of the Library of Virginia, call number M1621 .H42 1868.

Archivists and others in history-related careers aren’t always known for being overly interested in embracing emerging technologies.  A good many of us regard social media only as a fun diversion in our personal lives, with no obvious application to our professional goals. With that narrow mindset, we might as well cede the point to the chorus of naysayers proclaiming that the internet will eventually make libraries and archives irrelevant.

And yet somehow, Dale Dulaney, one of those “I refuse to ever join Facebook” guys, knew that social media could be the perfect tool to ignite an interest in and respect for archives and the work of archivists.  He knew that the Library of Virginia (like so many other cultural institutions) had to make its relevance obvious in a time when crippling funding cuts are always a possibility.  He knew that archives are often misunderstood or completely overlooked by the public at large.  He also knew that the LVA’s archives housed all kinds of unique research treasures, records ranging from poignant to hilarious, to just plain useful.  And he knew that we had at our fingertips a fast and low-cost way to show an often oblivious world that archives and archivists – what we have and what we do – matter.

I’ll spare you the details of the exhaustive work Dale invested to get this blog … read more »

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- Earthquakes and Dirty Dancing. Yes Virginia, There Is A (Very Tenuous) Connection.

The Tazewell Republican, 3 June 1897.

News reports seem to conclude that yesterday’s earthquake, centered in Mineral, Louisa County, was the most powerful earthquake to ever strike the state. Fortunately, damage was light in affected areas and the Library of Virginia sustained no damage and is operating normally today. It made us think about the 1897 quake that, until yesterday, was considered to be the most powerful to hit the state.

At about 2 o’clock in the afternoon on 31 May 1897, an earthquake with an estimated magnitude of 5.8-5.9 and centered around Pearisburg in Giles County, hit the Atlantic Coast. According to the 3 June 1897 edition of The Tazewell Republican the Giles County Circuit Court, which had just reconvened, emptied into the courtyard without prompting. The paper reported that “…bricks flew from off the houses; riding horses secured to the racks about, broke loose and fled and neighed; the dust arose from the rolling earth…” The paper also described a general sense of panic.

Newspapers further afield, like The Roanoke Times, struggled to discern exaggeration from fact. Reports that Giles County’s Mountain Lake, one of two natural lakes in Virginia and a long-time resort area in the state, was drained by the quake proved to be false. Martin Williams, from Pearisburg, wrote the editor of the newspaper to dispel this report. “The earthquake was no worse in Giles … read more »

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- Primary Source Offers Questions and Clues About Will, Runaway Slave

Accomack County, Free Negro & Slave Records Box 1, Barcode 1138011.

Located among the odds and ends of Accomack County court records is this 1758 advertisement from Landon Carter of Richmond County for his runaway slave Will.  Landon Carter was one of the sons of Robert “King” Carter of Lancaster County and a rich man himself.  The advertisement is typical of runaway ads in that it seeks to provide as much information as possible about Will in order to facilitate his recapture:  looks, personality, friends and family, residence(s), and conjecture as to possible destination.  The ads are always interesting for what questions they provoke:  What was this “ill-Behaviour” that caused Will to be moved five counties north from Williamsburg to Richmond County?  What characteristics did he possess that would cause his owner to call him “sensible for a slave” (presumably a compliment)?  Were Will and Sarah particularly close, so much so that after his escape he risked fetching her so that she, too, could be free of slavery and the Carters?  Did Will, Sarah and Peter make good their getaway?

 (Citation: Accomack County, Free Negro & Slave Records Box 1, Barcode 1138011.)

 -Sarah Nerney, Senior Local Records Archivist… read more »

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- Aaron Burr Tried for Treason Today in 1807. Court Documents Here At LVA.


The indictment cover.

Two hundred four years ago, August 3, 1807, the former vice-president of the United States, Aaron Burr, was put on trial for treason. At a federal court held in the Virginia state capitol’s Old Hall of Delegates, John Marshall oversaw the proceedings and many of the most prominent names of the early federal period were subpoenaed, including the president Thomas Jefferson. The trial brought into question, among other things, the issues of executive privilege, state secrets, and the independence of the executive branch.

 Accused of plotting to foment war with Spain and seize land in the Midwest in order to form an independent nation, Burr was eventually acquitted of the charges. The trial records of the “Burr Conspiracy” are housed at The Library of Virginia’s archives along with the other records of the fourth circuit federal court. In addition to the original records of the trial, the LVA bookshelves hold numerous scholarly works examining the themes and controversies of one of the most sensational events of the day.


United States v. Aaron Burr, Indictment for Treason.

-Vince Brooks, Senior Local Records Archivist… read more »

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- Buy Me Some Peanuts And Cigarettes: Baseball Cards in the Archive


American Tobacco Company baseball card, T206 series (issued 1909-1911), featuring Ray Ryan of the Virginia League’s Roanoke Tigers. Item originally came with a pack of Old Mill cigarettes.


Contentnea Cigarettes baseball card, T209 series (issued 1910), featuring W. G. Smith of the Virginia League’s Portsmouth Truckers/Petersburg Goobers.

Tucked away in the Business Records Collections at the Library of Virginia are five 2.5 x 1.5 inch baseball cards issued by the American Tobacco Company.  Long before baseball cards were sold with bubble gum, they were sold with tobacco products.  Not only did the cards depict the major league stars of the day, but also minor leaguers throughout the country.  The five cards which make up the American Tobacco Company Baseball Cards collection (LVA Acc. 29187) feature Virginia League players.

Two of the cards in the collection, the color portraits of Perry Lipe and Ray Ryan, are part of what is known as the T206 series.  This series of cards, issued from 1909 to 1911, was sold with a wide range of tobacco products such as Sweet Caporal, Piedmont, and in the case of the Lipe and Ryan cards, Old Mill.  The minor leaguers in the series were from a variety of leagues across the country, including players from the Virginia, Texas, South Atlantic (Sally), and Southern Leagues.  The T206 series is known as the series containing the most valuable baseball card–the Honus Wagner card, which has been valued in some instances at over $2 million (based on condition).

The other three cards in LVA’s collection–of Martin (Marty) Walsh, George Cowan, and W. G. Smith–are part of the T209 photo series, printed in 1910.  … read more »