- Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia’s Food Culture


Richmond Pie Company Letterhead, circa 1924.

Usually at Out of the Box we offer up stories found by our archivists in the many collections held at the Library of Virginia, but today, we’re doing things differently. While creating this year’s Archives Month theme, “Homegrown,” we spent a lot of time chatting about family recipes. In my family, Millie’s Rolls are still famous years after her death. I never got to experience them, as she died before I was born, but aunts, uncles, and cousins still talk about them at every Hollar family reunion.  Before she died, Millie attempted to write out the magic behind her yeast rolls and the result was a list of baffling, imprecise instructions. In addition to the not-so-precise measurements of pinches and fingerfulls, the rising dough has to take a trip out to Betty Jean’s car—twice. You’re going to need a 1954 Ford before attempting these rolls.

I knew the Out of the Box readers would have similar stories from their families, and they did not disappoint. Recipes ranged from traditional Christmas puddings to oddities served up in Jello molds. There were food stained recipe cards and handwritten cookbooks crafted to ensure food traditions survived. Below are some of those recipes and the family stories that helped shape them.

This first recipe, shared by Mary Marlowe Leverette, comes with a famous Virginia connection. Mr. Lee’s Pie came … read more »

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- Mug Shot Monday: Clifton Roberts, No. 18699 and Sam Washington, No. 21202


Photograph of Clifton Roberts, No. 18699, Records of the Virginia Penitentiary, Series II. Prisoner Records, Subseries B. Photographs, Box 43, Accession 41558, State Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

Welcome to Mug Shot Monday!  This is the latest entry in a series of posts highlighting inmate photographs in the records of the Virginia Penitentiary.  Clifton Roberts and Sam Washington, the subjects of this week’s post, are linked by the stabbing death of Roberts by Washington in front of 800 prisoners in the Penitentiary in 1929.

According to Penitentiary Superintendent Rice M. Youell, Clifton Roberts was “the most dangerous Negro criminal serving time there.”  The 27-year-old West Indies native was convicted of robbery in the Henrico County Circuit Court in January 1923 and sentenced to 10 years in the Penitentiary.  Within four months of his arrival, Roberts lost 20% of his good time for falsifying his work ticket.  In 1924 Roberts, now at the State Farm in Goochland County, threatened to kill two prisoners.  Roberts attempted to kill a prisoner with a hammer but was stopped when another prisoner, John Byrd, broke a stool over Roberts’ head.  Roberts later attempted to stab Byrd.  In November 1924, Roberts twice escaped from State Convict Road Force Camp No. 5.  He was recaptured and two additional years were added to his sentence for attempted escape.

Sam Washington, a 26-year-old from Greensboro, North Carolina, was convicted in Richmond City in 1926 on one count of store breaking and two counts of housebreaking and sentenced to 23 years … read more »

- Frederick Co. Chancery Goes Digital


Buggy advertisements found in Frederick County Chancery Cause Columbia Wagon Co. vs. John G. Crisman & Co., etc., 1903-058.

The Library of Virginia, in partnership with the Frederick County Circuit Court Clerk’s Office, is pleased to announce that the digitization of Frederick County’s historic chancery causes, 1860-1912, is now complete. Both the index and images are available to researchers via the Chancery Records Index on the LVA’s Virginia Memory site.

The Frederick County chancery collection covers the years 1745 through 1926 (with digital images posted from 1860 through 1912). The chancery, or equity cases, are a valuable source of local, state, social, and legal history and serve as a primary source for understanding a locality’s history. They often contain correspondence, property lists (including slaves), lists of heirs, and vital statistics that reveal details that help tell the story of Virginia. Cases contain useful biographical, genealogical, and historical information and document a broad spectrum of citizens—rich and poor, black and white, slave and free.

Frederick County Chancery Cause 1867-007, Administrator of Hiram A. Jordan vs. Margaret Swann, etc., tells the story of how prior to the Civil War, Catherine Jordan, a free African-American, purchased her husband, Sylvester, but never technically freed him, and their son who attempted to buy his wife. Chancery cause 1899-058, Board of Supervisors of Frederick County, etc. vs. City of Winchester, etc. chronicles a dispute over whether the city or the county controlled the court house property they read more »

- Mug Shot Monday: Charles E. Beckner, No. 16663


Photograph of Charles E. Beckner, #16663, Records of the Virginia Penitentiary, Series IV. Office of the Superintendent, Subseries B. General Correspondence, Superintendent Rice M. Youell, Box 418, Folder 8, Accession 41558, State Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

Welcome to Mug Shot Monday!  This is the latest entry in a series of posts highlighting inmate photographs in the records of the Virginia Penitentiary.  Charles Beckner, the subject of this week’s post, began his life of crime at the age of 14.  By the time Beckner died in 1943, he had escaped three times from Virginia correctional facilities.

Charles Edwin Beckner, the ninth child of Winfield and Augusta Beckner, was born on 26 July 1898 in Tennessee.  After Winfield’s death in 1902, the family moved to Richmond, Virginia.  Charles probably was exposed to crime through his older brother Chester.  Chester, alias The Tennessee Kid, was arrested numerous times between 1906 and 1916 for highway robbery, stealing, and fighting.  He served several short sentences in jail but was never sentenced to the Penitentiary.  Charles wouldn’t be so lucky.

Beckner’s first brush with the law came in March 1913 when he was arrested for theft.  Beckner and three other boys were part of a gang of thieves who fenced their ill-gotten loot through Richmond fortune teller “Professor” Wilbur R. Lonzo.  The Richmond City Juvenile Court sentenced the boys to the Laurel Reformatory in Henrico County for an unspecified amount of time.  In September 1918 Beckner completed his World War I draft card in the Portsmouth City jail.  He was arrested on 9 May 1920 for committing … read more »

- Latest Digital Images of Legislative Petitions Now Available


Account of the services of slave Cuffy during the Revolutionary War, Petition of Eleanor Bowery, 1788, Elizabeth City County, Legislative Petitions to the Virginia General Assembly, State Government Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

Digital images of Legislative Petitions to the Virginia General Assembly, 1776 to 1865, from Bath County through Essex County are now available on Virginia Memory, the Library of Virginia’s digital collections website. The list of localities added includes present-day West Virginia counties such as Barbour, Berkeley, Boone, Braxton, Brooke, Cabell, Calhoun, and Doddridge Counties. It also includes numerous localities classified as Lost Records Localities such as Bland, Buckingham, Caroline, Charles City, Dinwiddie, and Elizabeth City Counties. With this addition, the number of legislative petitions available for viewing online currently number over 5000.

For researchers of African-American history and genealogy, the legislative petitions are an invaluable primary source on the topics of slavery, free African-Americans, and race relations prior to the Civil War. One will find petitions from slave owners seeking approval to import their slaves into the Commonwealth from another state; free African-Americans seeking permission to remain in the Commonwealth; heirs of slave owners seeking to prevent the emancipation of slaves freed by their parent’s will; free African-Americans seeking divorce from their spouse. The following are specific examples of the research potential on African-American history and genealogy that can be found in the collection.

John S. Harrison of Berkeley County petitioned the General Assembly in 1810 asking for permission to import three slaves, named Paris, Letty, and Daniel, from Maryland to Virginia. Harrison … read more »

- Kicking Up A Stink In Virginia Beach


Map of Virginia Beach Owned by the Norfolk and Virginia Beach Railroad and Improvement Company, Portsmouth City Chancery Cause 1911-015, A. Johnson Ackiss for etc. vs. E. H. Morrison.

Here at Out of the Box we’re still celebrating Archives Month 2013, and while getting ready for the Library of Virginia’s 30 October event “Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia’s Cultural Heritage in its Archives and Special Collections,” we’ve had many conversations about local food movements and urban farming.  Some issues that came up included land use and neighborhood development—especially when it comes to animals. Some people just don’t want a rooster or goat living next door. Livestock in the city limits is certainly not a strictly modern issue. In fact, we uncovered an early 20th-century Portsmouth City chancery cause in which a horse was causing problems in the summer resort town of Virginia Beach.

The Norfolk and Virginia Beach Railroad and Improvement Company purchased land in Princess Anne County in 1883 to create a “high order summer resort” called Virginia Beach.   The company hoped to attract refined and cultured people to purchase land to build cottages and residences. The original deeds sold by the company included seven covenants that were to be followed for the construction of buildings and use of the property.  One of the covenants forbade the building of public or private stables on the lots.   According to B. P. Holland, a real estate agent, the covenants were made “to have a high order of summer resorts and to do away with … read more »

- Archives as art


A group of customer orders for goods from Easley, Holt and Company, a general store in Halifax County, Virginia. The orders are seen as they were originally kept by the store, attached to a piece of wire roughly in the order they were received and filled.  Easley, Holt and Company Records (LVA Accession 50951)

Discovered in a box of election records from the Secretary of the Commonwealth by a member of the Library of Virginia’s State Records staff, this distinctive-looking work of art came to us just as it had hung in Easley, Holt and Company, a general store in Halifax County, Virginia, operated by James Stone Easley (1802-1879). How and when it arrived is not clear, and it is a mystery how it ended up in a box of state records.  Since being transferred to the Library’s Private Papers collection, it forms part of the Easley, Holt and Company Records, Accession 50951.

The composition, now only preserved in the photograph on the right, consisted of customer orders for goods, created from 1837 to 1844.  The orders, of various shapes and sizes, were attached to a simple piece of wire, roughly in chronological order as they were received and filled.  The result, although dating from the 19th century, is a hanging paper sculpture that the viewer could imagine seeing today in a contemporary art gallery.

The hanging store orders are for clothing and material, dry goods, liquor, medicine, and other items. Some of the orders for cloth have a swatch of material attached, with instructions that it be matched by cloth that is in stock. Easley was also postmaster, so customers frequently added a request that their mail … read more »

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- Mug Shot Monday: Frank Perry, No. 5610


Photograph of Frank Perry, No. 5610, Records of the Virginia Penitentiary, Series II. Prisoner Records, Subseries B. Photographs and Negatives, Box 20, Accession 41558, State Records Collection, Library of Virginia.

Welcome to Mug Shot Monday!  This is the latest entry in a series of posts highlighting inmate photographs in the records of the Virginia Penitentiary.  Frank Perry, the subject of this week’s post, was a twice convicted felon who killed himself in front of a courtyard filled with guards.

In December 1899 Frank Perry, a North Carolina native using the name Frank Swann, was sentenced to three years in the Penitentiary for stealing and housebreaking.  He was discharged on 15 July 1902.  Perry didn’t stay out of trouble for long.  The Newport News Corporation Court in September 1904 sentenced Perry to two years in the Penitentiary for felonious cutting.  An additional five years were added to Perry’s sentence since this was his second conviction.

Monday, 6 July 1908, began as any other day at the Penitentiary.  At 6 a.m. the guards issued the call for the prisoners to form the breakfast line.  As the cell doors opened, Frank Perry began to fight with this cellmate, Upshur Lewis.  One of the guards separated the men and ordered Perry to the courtyard.  According to the Richmond Time-Dispatch, Perry appeared to comply with the guard’s order when he suddenly “placed his hand on the railing and dived over twenty-five feet to the stone floor.”  His head hit the floor violently, knocking Perry unconscious; he also … read more »

- All’s Fair in…


Detail shot of blue ribbons won at the Virginia State Fair in 1914 and 1928 (see photo gallery in body of article to see ribbons in their entirety). Records of the State Fair of Virginia, Library of Virginia Accession 42808.

The smell of deep-fried pickles and cotton candy.  The sounds of music and laughter.  The sights of the midway.  For well over a century and a half, the State Fair of Virginia has been one of the sure signs that autumn has arrived, and this year is no exception.  Beginning last Friday and running through October 6, rides, exhibitions, and entertainment are drawing thousands to the fairgrounds for a good time.  Here at the Library of Virginia, the long history of the fair is documented in the State Fair of Virginia Records, 1927-2005 (Accession 42808)

Founded by the Virginia Agricultural Society to promote Virginia’s agriculture, the fair was established in 1854 near a horse race track at what is now Monroe Park in downtown Richmond.  The fair prospered during the 1850s, but, like much else, its annual observance was halted by the Civil War

After the Civil War, the fair relocated to a new site near the current home of the Science Museum of Virginia and continued to grow, but over-expansion led to debt which closed the fair in 1896. Ten years later, the Virginia State Fair Association restarted the fair, this time at the present home of the Diamond baseball park.  In 1920, the fair expanded its schedule to ten days.  In 1942, the Association purchased Strawberry Hill just outside Richmond, but World … read more »

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- Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia’s Cultural Heritage


Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia's Cultural Heritage in its Archives and Special Collections official poster for Archives Month 2013.

October and Archives Month are finally here! This year’s theme, “Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia’s Cultural Heritage in its Archives and Special Collections,” celebrates the diverse culture in the commonwealth—agriculture, viticulture, horticulture, food culture, and even film culture. During Archives Month 2013, Virginia’s archives and special collections repositories will highlight the historical records, photographs, and moving images that document the commonwealth’s many traditions. Archives Month is a great time to attend an event or to explore your Virginia history by discovering an archives collection near you. For more information on repositories and events in your area, check out the Virginia Archives Month 2013 website.

The Library of Virginia is participating in “Homegrown: Celebrating Virginia’s Cultural Heritage” with a unique event bringing together food-culture historians—the modern interpreters of historical foodways—and local food-movement advocates: practitioners, growers, and promoters of regional food and beverages. Enjoy a Virginia open house with tastings, literature, and a chance to talk with the specialists on Wednesday, 30 October, from 6­­–8:30 p.m. Virginia products and books will be for sale and related items from the Library of Virginia’s collection will be displayed.

So, how else can you get involved? By participating in our Unique Family Recipe Contest! As part of the Archives Month celebrations, we want to pay homage to Virginia cooking traditions. Do you have a recipe passed down from generation to generation … read more »

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