Tag Archives: Governor Henry C. Stuart

- Settling the Liquor Question: The 1914 Referendum and Prohibition in Virginia

Talk about spooky! Although the 18th Amendment didn’t institute nation-wide prohibition in the U.S. until January 1920, Virginia banned alcohol at the stroke of midnight on Halloween in 1916. Virginia went dry as the result of a 1914 state-wide referendum, setting off a legislative process that culminated in the passage of the Mapp Law, which went into effect on 1 November 1916, forbidding Virginians from producing or selling—but not consuming—alcoholic beverages.

Though alcoholic consumption was commonplace in Virginia during its earliest days—especially since it was often safer than the water!—as the 19th century progressed, more and more segments of the population began to speak out against the evils of alcohol and overindulgence. The rise of the Temperance movement brought men and women alike to advocate personal policies of temperance or abstinence. Organizations like the Sons of Temperance, the Anti-Saloon League, or the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU), which opened its first Virginia chapter in 1882, sought to fill their membership rosters.

Early temperance organizations in the South initially had a hard time recruiting due to their association with abolitionist movements and the ‘northern invaders’ of the Civil War. Ongoing fears of African-American voters and their potential political power birthed fears of third parties and single-issue voters who could divide support for the existing parties that propped up white supremacy. In Virginia, the problem … read more »

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- I’ll drink to that! Governor Henry Stuart Records Processed


Drawing by W.R. Cassell for a ceremonial flask to be used by Governor Stuart and the Governor of California to combine the waters of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in 1915. Virginia. Governor (1914-1918 : Stuart). Executive Papers of Governor Henry C. Stuart, 1857-1918, Panama-Pacific International Exposition - Decorations, etc. State government records collection, The Library of Virginia. (Box 42, Folder 4)

The Executive Papers of Governor Henry C. Stuart, 1914-1918 (LVA accession 28722) are now available to researchers as part of an ongoing project to arrange and describe the papers of Virginia’s governors that have been lost thus far in the archival backlog.  Once housed in acidic boxes with some metal pins and staples, Stuart’s papers now have been reboxed and refoldered.  More importantly, the papers have received detailed archival processing in order to unearth some of the gems below.  Though not the most important administration of the 20th century, it is clear Stuart’s was eventful and the records illustrate the significant moments of his term in office.  From the unveiling of a statue to Virginia’s dead at Gettysburg to the country’s initial involvement in World War I, Stuart’s papers are a valuable resource for early 20th century Virginia researchers.

-Craig S. Moore, State Records Appraisal Archivist