Tag Archives: trial

- Hey, We Drink Out Of There!


Photograph of Fannie Lillian Madison, circa 1883. (Commonwealth of Virginia versus Thomas J. Cluverius, 1885, Barcode 1170946)

On the morning of 14 March 1885, Lysander Rose, caretaker of the Old Reservoir in Richmond, went about his normal duties, but this morning would not be a typical one for Rose. As he approached the reservoir, Rose found what appeared to be a piece of broken shoe string, a woman’s red glove, and what he described as signs of a “desperate struggle.” When he peered over into the water, Rose saw “floating near the top the flounce or something of a woman’s dress and one leg jutting up.” After the coroner arrived, the muddy body of a young woman was lifted from the water. A cursory examination revealed that she had slight bruising on her face, a swollen mouth, and a rent in her gown at the elbow. Later, it would be discovered that she was also eight months pregnant. Several days and several false identifications passed before the body was finally identified as that of Fannie Lillian Madison.

At the time of her death, Lillian Madison, as she was commonly called by friends and family, was 23 years old, pregnant, and unmarried. Lillian had checked into the Exchange Hotel in Richmond under the name Fannie Merton mere days before her body was discovered. Lillian’s pregnancy (without the prospect of a husband) supported the coroner’s initial ruling of suicide, but as more evidence began … read more »

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- Aaron Burr Tried for Treason Today in 1807. Court Documents Here At LVA.


The indictment cover.

Two hundred four years ago, August 3, 1807, the former vice-president of the United States, Aaron Burr, was put on trial for treason. At a federal court held in the Virginia state capitol’s Old Hall of Delegates, John Marshall oversaw the proceedings and many of the most prominent names of the early federal period were subpoenaed, including the president Thomas Jefferson. The trial brought into question, among other things, the issues of executive privilege, state secrets, and the independence of the executive branch.

 Accused of plotting to foment war with Spain and seize land in the Midwest in order to form an independent nation, Burr was eventually acquitted of the charges. The trial records of the “Burr Conspiracy” are housed at The Library of Virginia’s archives along with the other records of the fourth circuit federal court. In addition to the original records of the trial, the LVA bookshelves hold numerous scholarly works examining the themes and controversies of one of the most sensational events of the day.


United States v. Aaron Burr, Indictment for Treason.

-Vince Brooks, Senior Local Records Archivist… read more »

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