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  • "He asked me to take my hat and leave the house"
  • "He asked me to take my hat and leave the house"
  • "He asked me to take my hat and leave the house"
On January 7, 1860, John W. Anthony wrote to his sister about events at Randolph-Macon College.
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My Dear Callie

"He asked me to take my hat and leave the house"

John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, January 7, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.

Callie Anthony says: John William Anthony is my younger brother, but I call him Johnny. He wrote to me in January from Randolph-Macon College, in Boyton. He couldn't come home for Christmas, and we missed him dreadfully. I told him all about our festivities, though. I wish his teachers would give him more than just one day off for the holiday.

Johnny told me of a near-fight he had with another student, but he asked me not to tell Ma and Pa. I suppose I'll wait and let him tell his own story, but I hope he will stay out of trouble after this. Still, I'm happy he stood up for his honor; that other boy had no right to tell him he was being disorderly.

John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, January 7, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.

R M College
Jan 7th /60
Dear Callie
I have just received your's and Papa's letter and was exceedingly glad to hear from home for I had n't gotten a letter from home for about 2 months and you know that is a long time "between drinks" if you will allow me to use that "phrase" I hope it is never that long before you get a letter from home, I think Brother Ben has written to me twise since I have been here, very often, "over the left" I haven't written to him very often but I think he ought not wait [for] me, because whin I write home that will do for all, I guess I have said enough on that, so I will leave that point for some one else to discuss I am happy to hear that you had such fine times and enjoyed your-self so much how I do wish I was had been there I had the dullest times I ever had before, my last Xmas from home I think if I have my way about it. I have been where the boys were skaiting to day. I had a good deal of fun, but could not [s]k[a]it [skate] any myself.
Came very near having a fight with Bob Isbell the other day I reckon you would like to know what about I told one of the boys a question in a low whisper and he said it was disorder and I told him it was not and he asked me to take my hat and leave the house which you know I did not do and that is the whole history of the affair dont write home any thing about it as I will write in a few days and give them the the story of it. I know you are getting sick of this letter for it is as dry as it can be, but [word torn away] do any better, nothing [word torn away] write about.
Wedding took place here the other day, but did n't get a bid, it hapened to be a darkey wedding
Excuse my bad writing something is the matter to night cant write the bold han I allways write. I am thinking about my Dear little Katy so you can account for it Give my love to Katy and tell her I "sometimes think of Katy"
excuse this dry letter it is the best I can do nothing to write about
your Bro J W ANTHONY