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  • "Affairs at Norfolk and Portsmouth"
The Charleston Mercury on May 1, 1861, reprinted several paragraphs from a lost issue of the Norfolk Herald reporting on events at the navy yard near Norfolk and at Fort Monroe at the mouth of the James River.
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"Affairs at Norfolk and Portsmouth"

Charleston (S.C.) Mercury, May 1, 1861, reporting news from a lost issue of the Norfolk Herald.

The Charleston Mercury on May 1, 1861, reprinted several paragraphs from a lost issue of the Norfolk Herald reporting on events at the navy yard near Norfolk and at Fort Monroe at the mouth of the James River. The United States Army retained possession of Fort Monroe after the U.S. Navy abandoned the navy yard in mid-April 1861, set fire to some of the buildings, and scuttled the steam frigate USS Merrimack. Refloated and refitted later in the year, the Merrimack was rechristened CSS Virginia, one of the first ironclad warships in the world.

Charleston (S.C.) Mercury, May 1, 1861, reporting news from a lost issue of the Norfolk Herald.

Affairs at Norfolk and Portsmouth.
Works for defence are still being rapidly erected and contributions of money are daily made to meet all expenditures. JAMES H. BEHAN, of Norfolk, has made a donation of $500 for the relief of the families of volunteers. The city councils have appropriated $10,000 for the relief of the poor. The Norfolk Herald says:
Operations at the Portsmouth Navy-Yard have been recommenced, and seem to be going on with the same order and regularity as before the stampede of the debauched incendiary crew who so recently attempted to destroy it. Laborers are engaged in clearing away the ruins; workmen employed in several of the shops, finishing up work previously commenced, the clink of hammers and buzz of machinery heard in all parts of the yard, and boats rowed by jolly jack tars plying back and forth as formerly.
FORTRESS MONROE.
It having been rumored that several of the officers stationed at Fort Monroe, natives of Virginia, are detained at that post contrary to their wishes, and under forcible restraint, a delegation of citizens of Norfolk, accompanied by the Mayor, went down on Tuesday, under a flag of truce, to inquire into the matter. Their mission resulted in being assured that such is not the fact.