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Secession of South Carolina

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  • Secession of South Carolina
The secession of South Carolina prompted the editor of the Leesburg Democratic Mirror to consider the prospect of civil war in an editorial published on December 26, 1860.
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Secession of South Carolina

Editorial in Leesburg Democratic Mirror, December 26, 1860.

The editor of the Leesburg Democratic Mirror, in Loudoun County, recognized that the secession of South Carolina had forced the nation to face the prospect of civil war. "The secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union," he announced, "which occurred at one o'clock on Thursday last, has given to our national affairs a more serious and alarming aspect than many have hitherto been willing even to admit as probable." In the 1860 presidential election, voters in the northeastern county gave nearly 70 percent of their votes for John Bell of the Constitutional Union Party. Abraham Lincoln received 11 votes. In February 1861, the county's voters elected two firm opponents of secession to the Virginia Convention.

Editorial in Leesburg Democratic Mirror, December 26, 1860.
Secession of South Carolina.
The secession of South Carolina from the Federal Union, which occurred at one o'clock on Thursday last, has given to our national affairs a more serious and alarming aspect than many have hitherto been willing even to admit as probable. One star has thus been blotted from the glorious constellation, and we are no more a united people. The work of disintegration has commenced—who is able to ken its bounds, or reunite the severed chord? If fanaticism will take warning at once, and render unto an insulted and outraged people, their very moderate and just demands, harmony and good fellowship may yet brood over the land, and our citizens bask in the sunlight of that Union which in days past has been our proudest boast at home, and our greatest glory abroad. But if such is not the case, and injury be still added to insult, the bold hearts and stout nerves of southern chivalry may yet be forced, in self-defence, to take part in the unnatural strife, and join in the clash of arms.