Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
THIS PAGE HAS BEEN FORMATTED FOR EASY PRINTING

Union or Secession
  • "A Voice from North Western Virginia"
A May 2, 1861, article in the Parkersburg News condemned the western statehood movement that had just begun and boasted that the people in the Ohio Valley city could defend themselves "against Northern aggression."
« Return to Virginians Prepare for War

"A Voice from North Western Virginia"

Report in the Parkersburg News of May 2, 1861, reprinted in Lynchburg Daily Virginian, May 11, 1861.

A May 2, 1861, article in the Parkersburg News condemned the western statehood movement that had just begun and boasted that the people in the Ohio Valley city could defend themselves "against Northern aggression." The author of the article was in the minority. In February 1861 the county's voters overwhelmingly elected John Jay Jackson to represent them in the Virginia Convention. Jackson voted against secession on April 4, when it failed, and again on April 17, when it passed. The convention later expelled him for taking part in the conventions in Wheeling that led to the creation of West Virginia. Unofficial estimates of the May 23, 1861, referendum on secession in Wood County are that 257 men voted to ratify the Ordinance of Secession and 1,995 men voted against.

Report in the Parkersburg News of May 2, 1861, reprinted in Lynchburg Daily Virginian, May 11, 1861.

A VOICE FROM NORTH WESTERN VIRGINIA.— Says the Parkersburg News, of May 2d:
The citizens of this portion of Virginia are united in a determination to defend ourselves against Northern aggression. We are also, able to do so. In this Congressional District we have over twenty thousand men capable of bearing arms. We need no help from abroad and desire none, unless we call for it.
There is a weak and peurile attempt on foot for a division of the State, started by a few Republicans and their sympathizers in this section. Not one-twentieth of our citizens are in favor of it, and the whole thing will end only in the discomfiture and defeat of its advocates. Already are numbers fleeing from the sinking ship, and the movement is scarcely worthy of a passing notice.