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Union or Secession
  • "Patriotic and accomplished daughters"
One month after the voting men of Virginia ratified the Ordinance of Secession, the Lynchburg Daily Virginian reported on June 25, 1861, that women in the Valley of Virginia were "in an intense blaze of patriotic ardor for the success of the Southern cause."
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"Patriotic and accomplished daughters"

Lynchburg Daily Virginian, June 25, 1861.

One month after the voting men of Virginia ratified the Ordinance of Secession, the Lynchburg Daily Virginian reported on June 25, 1861, that the "patriotic and accomplished daughters" of the Valley of Virginia were "in an intense blaze of patriotic ardor for the success of the Southern cause, in the present desperate and perilous struggle with Northern despotism and brutal vandalism." White women in all regions of the state reacted in similar ways to the possibility of warfare, whether they resided in the parts of Virginia where the men had chosen to fight for the Confederacy or in northwestern Virginia and other communities where most of the men chose to defend the United States.

Lynchburg Daily Virginian, June 25, 1861.

Virginia Daughters and Matrons.
We are informed, from a reliable source, that the mothers and daughters of Virginia, in the valley of the Warm, Hot, and Healing Springs are in an intense blaze of patriotic ardor for the success of the Southern cause, in the present desperate and perilous struggle with Northern despotism and brutal vandalism. They not only employ their store houses, ply their needles by day and by night, and exhaust the usual clothing material, but cut up and torn into clothing their counterpanes and other bed covering to make clothing for the soldiers. In their patriotic and benevolent work, Mrs. Mary Ann Goode, and her patriotic and accomplished daughters of the Hot, and the true-hearted and benevolent Mrs. Porter, of the Healing Springs are conspicuous. On Tuesday last, as a fine company of Rockingham Rangers sojourned awhile at the Hot Springs to water their horses, Mrs. Goode and her four amiable and accomplished daughters, and interesting daughter-in-law, gathered up everything in and about the house ready for eating and sent to their relief—a presentation so timely that it was received with hearty thanks and thundering cheers by the soldiers. In some two or three hours after the company passed on, a poor fellow who had lagged behind from sickness, made his appearance. As soon as this patriotic and kind hearted family heard it, the good mother gathered up a supply of sponge cake and sweet meats—all that she could conveniently have—and sent to him by a servant. On the delivery of which, the sick soldier, with a heart full of gratitude, said to the servant, tell your mistress I thank her, and for her kindness, "I will kill two Yankees for her." This answer produced a severe struggle between the love of country and the humanity of the good Samaritan mother. She involuntarily exclaimed, "Oh! not kill them, but drive them away!" forgetting that some had to be killed before the others could be driven away. Can the mad and reckless rulers of the North hope to subdue a people, where men, women and children are ready to sacrifice ease, comfort, property, and life, to maintain independence and repel the invader? If they do, vain is their hope.