Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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December 1859 to June 1860

Union or Secession
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  • Sallie [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, December [1], 1859, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Old Brown of Kansas notoriety"
  • John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, December 4, 1859, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "About John Brown"
  • John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, January 7, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Take my hat and leave the house"
  • Unidentified cousin to Callie Anthony, January 11, 1860, [last pages are missing], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I wish I could tell you what I know."
  • Emilia Haden to Callie Anthony, February 11, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "She can inspire a feeling of love"
  • Mary S. Adams to Callie Anthony, February 18, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I have acted the fool to perfection"
  • Charlie [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, February 20, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I fear Secession in all its forms"
  • Alexander and Goot to Charles Anthony, June 27, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Breckinridge & Lane are the nominees"
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« Return to Callie Anthony's Mailbag

December 1859 to June 1860

Callie Anthony

Callie Anthony says: I'm worried about the political tensions that keep getting worse and worse. After that abolitionist John Brown raided the United States arsenal at Harpers Ferry in October 1859, people have been getting more and more upset. We've been afraid that other abolitionists will incite the slaves to rebel and there will be more violence and bloodshed. People in the free states and the slave states are even more distrustful of each other now, and I don't know if these differences can be solved. The presidential election campaign doesn't seem to be helping resolve these problems. The Democrats are arguing so much that at their April convention they split into two groups. The Northern faction nominated Illinois senator Stephen A. Douglas and the Southern faction nominated Vice President John C. Breckinridge, from Kentucky. The Republicans nominated a known opponent of slavery, Abraham Lincoln, of Illinois, but people around here will never vote for him. But there's another party that hopes to preserve the Union, and John Bell, of Tennessee, is the presidential candidate of the Constitutional Union Party.