Virginia Memory, Library of Virginia
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Callie Anthony's Mailbag

Union or Secession
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  • Sallie [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, December [1], 1859, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Old Brown of Kansas notoriety"
  • John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, December 4, 1859, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "About John Brown"
  • John William Anthony to Callie Anthony, January 7, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Take my hat and leave the house"
  • Unidentified cousin to Callie Anthony, January 11, 1860, [last pages are missing], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I wish I could tell you what I know."
  • Emilia Haden to Callie Anthony, February 11, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "She can inspire a feeling of love"
  • Mary S. Adams to Callie Anthony, February 18, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I have acted the fool to perfection"
  • Charlie [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, February 20, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I fear Secession in all its forms"
  • Alexander and Goot to Charles Anthony, June 27, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Breckinridge & Lane are the nominees"
  • George Ann [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Wear Breckenridge next your heart"
  • Sue Ragsdale to Callie Anthony, October 15, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Our glorious Union will soon be no more"
  • Sue Gilmore to Callie Anthony, November 4[–6], 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Abolitionists in our midst"
  • Unidentified cousin to Callie Anthony, November 13, 1860 [some pages are missing from end of letter], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I am a Southern Rights man"
  • Anselm L. Haden to Charles Anthony, December 17, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I see no safety for Va in the union."
  • Bettie Anthony McDermed to Almira Anthony, December 31, 1860, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "The whole of our state will be conquered"
  • Sue Gilmore to Callie Anthony, January 9, 1861, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "We are no longer one of the united States"
  • Sue Ragsdale to Callie Anthony, January 21, 1861, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "I am a secessionist per se"
  • Charlotte [surname unknown] to Callie Anthony, February 4, 1861, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Are you for disunion or not."
  • Sue Gilmore Atkins to
    "You were supprised to hear of my marriage"
  • Emily Leftwich Haden to Callie Anthony, n.d. [ca. May 1861], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "When the summons came for my dear boy"
  • Nannie B. Anthony to Callie Anthony, May 2, 1861, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "When he dressed up in his Uniform"
  • Unidentified cousin to Callie Anthony, May 2, 1861, [last pages missing], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Thrown off the shackles of Lincoln ism"
  • Unidentfied cousin to Callie Anthony, May 6, 1861, [last pages missing], Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Hemmed us in completely"
  • Charles Lewis Anthony to Callie Anthony, July 23, 1861, Anthony Family Papers, 1785–1952, Acc. 35647, 35648, Library of Virginia.,
    "Only let the yankees be driven from our soil"
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Callie Anthony's Mailbag

Callie Anthony

Callie Anthony says: I'm Callie Anthony, and I was born on March 16, 1839. My full name is Susan Austin Callie Jane Anthony, but I never use all those names. I grew up and still live in Campbell County, Virginia, near Evington at my father's house, Walnut Hill. It's a beautiful place, at the foot of a mountain and two creeks run by the house down to the Otter River. We're southwest of Lynchburg.

My older sister Morgiana died a few years ago, and I miss her terribly. She had just gotten married when she died. I also had a baby brother who didn't live. I still have two brothers: Ben, who is married and lives nearby, and John William. Ben's wife Jennie is sweet as she can be, and her brother Victor is such a gentleman! (He's a lawyer in North Carolina, and he's not married, yet.) My brother Johnny goes to Randolph Macon College, but he just joined the Confederate Army. My Pa is Charles Anthony. He's had some trouble with his leg recently, but he's well for being 68 years old. He's completely in charge of the estate and all his business concerns, although Johnny helps him a lot when he's home. My Ma is Martha Davis (Haden) Anthony. I've been helping her with running the house since I got home from school, but what I really want is to get married and have my own house to run! I know I could be a good mistress, and run a household, servants and everything, perfectly. I just need to find that perfect man.

The last couple of years I've been attending Hollins Institute, the best girls school in all of Virginia, maybe anywhere! My favorite subject was English; I just love to read books and write. I wish I could have gone back to finish my last year of school, but with the war breaking out, it wasn't really feasible. Now all my writing is in letters to my many cousins and friends. I'm lucky to have so many correspondents, and we have to write since it is hard to travel too far. Here are a few of my letters I thought I'd share. And don't forget to check out some of the photographs in my scrapbook.

Letters to Callie:

December 1859 to June 1860

Sectional tensions were high following John Brown's October 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry and during the presidential election campaign in 1860.

July 1860 to January 1861

After Abraham Lincoln won election as president of the United States in November 1860, some Southern states began to secede while some Virginians worked to craft a compromise to preserve the Union.

February 1861 to July 1861

When the Virginia Convention began meeting in February 1861, most of the delegates did not advocate immediate secession, but events beyond Virginia's borders in April 1861 resulted in the Convention's vote to secede.