Making History: Transcribe is made possible in part by federal funding provided through the Library Services and Technology Act program administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Wright, Lucy & Claiborne, Lucy: Petition, Richmond City

image 2 of 4

Zoom in to read each word clearly.
Some images may have writing in several directions. To rotate an image, hold down shift-Alt and use your mouse to spin the image so it is readable.

This transcription is complete!

be sold as slaves. During the period however while the overseers of the poor were considering the case of your petitions, the court for the said City had declared the children of your petitioners to be free born blacks and registered them as such. From these determinations it [besulled?], That while the children of your petition[ers], were declared to be free and entitled to all the rights and privileges of free born blacks within this Commonwealth your petitioners were to be converted into slaves and seperated from their infant children two of whoom [whom] are yet dependent upon them for that sustenance which nature has provided the mother should for a time afford her [offspring?]. This harsh and as it appeared to the Court and the Overseers of the poor unanticipated application of the act of assembly to the case of your petitioners induced them with a humanity and promptness which reflects Credit on them to suspend their order of sale until proper provisions might be made for the care of your petitioners by the Legislature of this state. Your petitioners avow their utter inability to remove out of this Commonwealth; they possess no means, to transport their children beyond its limits and it cannot be expected they ought to separate themselves for ever from them; they would prefer for themselves even a state of slavery to such a separation. They therefore pray that a law may be enacted cancelling the forfeiture which has been by

by your petitioners, incur[r]ed and giving them permission to reside within the state as free persons; and as in duty bound they will ever pray. Lucy Wright Lucy Claiborne

I have a perfect knowledge of the facts stated in the foregoing petition, & am satisfied they are truely set forth; I believe that the petitioners could obtain the almost unanimous signature of the citizens of Richmond to their petition. December 20th 1821. Robert G. Scott