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Caroline and Cecil Burleigh letters, undated

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Capt's box by him, he charged 6 cents per pound It cost 5 dollars to send that box. they had some heavy things an ax, hatchet &c, I think Adams & Co's Express must have raised on their price. I should think they charged a good deal more in preportion [sic] to the distance than they did but it may be that it is because you are not on any direct railroad communication - they charge 5 cents per pound. I have the receipt, & if they dont get it through to you I'll sue them, may'nt I? When the things that we send get through to you poor fellows in good shape, we dont mind the expense, but it is discouraging to have things get lost, or delayed & spoilt. I have heretofore had good luck in sending the little I have sent to you: hope you may get what I have sent to day before it is spoilt. The box was directed, & the receipts given to be sent to Stafford Court house & whether they will deliver it to you there, or leave it at the steamboat landing is more than I know. Knowing when it started perhaps you can judge a little how soon to look for it. I hope it wont be over a week going. The receipt after acknowledging the payment to that place reads "Which it is mutualy [sic] agreed is to be forwarded to our agency most convenient to destination only, & there delivered to other parties to complete the transportation, on to the order of the Consignee, or to the order of the quartermaster or other officer of the regiment to which the consignee is attached It is further mutualy [sic] agreed that the Adams Express Co. are not to be held liable or responsible for the property herein mentioned after delivery of the army waggons [sic] or to the order of the officer of the regiment" Elford got your watch for me to day. they charged $2.25 cts. It looks better then it did when it got home. I shant try & answer your letter to night I will Sunday if nothing happens. I am pretty well now Louise is well only her teeth bother her yet. Mother sets here knitting your stockings she sends love. I got your letter which had the "usefull" [sic] in it Monday night & answered it the same night. I felt rather blue that night & [vertically at left and top of first page] tired & thought that the tone of your letter was'nt [sic] like you, but I guess it was more my feelings than you. Your letter tonight seemed like your own dear self, & did my heart good. I asked baby if she had been down to Virginia playing with Papa's boots. she said "I like to go down Ginia play Papa's boots" she was very much engaged about it. Thought she could co if I would only put on her things. I meant to have sent you some stamps but I lent some today & have only one left I will get some before I write again & now my dear husband good night with much love & many kisses. God in mercy keep you & bring you home to Carrie