Making History: Transcribe is made possible in part by federal funding provided through the Library Services and Technology Act program administered by the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

Transcription Page

Caroline and Cecil Burleigh letters, undated

image 2 of 6
more information: digital collection
This transcription is complete!

but it didn't come, but I hope it will to morrow night, Louise [young daughter] says tonight. "you did'nt [sic] get letter Mama, I sorly Mama you did'nt [sic] get letter from papa tonight", dear little one, she has had a fall tonight that worries me some, there has been a aid society meeting at the [illegible], Mrs James came in just at night, & wanted to see some of the things, (they keep them here) & I opened the hall door, into the front hall. I left Louise with mother & hurried out of door for it was getting late & I had'nt [sic] picked up things, & done the chores, in a few moments I had occasion to come in, & just as I came, I heard a heavy fall in the front hall. I ran & picked baby up, she had fell down stairs, but I dont know how far she was up them, there was quite a bump raised on her temple. I put on cold water & bound on brown paper wet with cold water, & she seemed to feel as well as ever, but about an hour afterwards she had a vomiting spell, once or twice when I have told Dr of her having a fall, he would ask immediately, how it affected her, if she vomited, she never has before after falling & it worried me a good deal, but perhaps I should'nt [sic] have felt so troubled about it, if I had'nt [sic] have been very nervous & tired. She is in her cradle now, sleeping quietly & I hope we shant see any more of the effects of the fall. She has been out with me a good share of the day, & felt guilty then because I did'nt [sic] keep her with me, but it was getting towards night & I had so much to see to, Oh if God should see fit to take her; it seems as if I should go crazy, but you must'nt [sic] give your self unnecessary trouble about it, for you know I am easily frightened when I think anything is the matter with any [of] my few dear ones. I wish I might know of you, to night they say that Mark wrote home in a letter they had last night, that fever was getting into the regiment I am very sorry to hear that, try & take as good care of yourself as you can. I am so afraid they will send you off south father [farther] if they do I fear so much for you; Oh how I wish I had you home, where if sickness was

[upside down at bottom] Mother sends love. I dont happen to have but one extra postage stamp on hand, that I will put on a envelope and send along.