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is now forcing women into many fields of activity hitherto unopen to them and for which they are not well prepared. Although women have always furnished seventy per cent and more of the teachers in the high schools, to-day less than half of these women have had college training amounting to a two year course. Last year seventeen per cent of the fifty-six per cent of high school teachers having two years of college training was made up of students of William and Mary, the University of Virginia, V.M.I, and V.P.I. This year the places of these men are in most cases filled by women. The same is true of teachers formerly recruited from the male denominational, non-sectarian, and junior colleges. Unless the women who take their places are properly equipped for the work, the boys and the girls of the future will enter college or will go out into life with but meagre equipment for their life's work. The quality of the man coming to the University will not be up to the standard demanded there. Then the University must lower its standard to meet the needs of the new students, or the students will find it impossible to keep up with their classes and will drop out of college. Either of these conditions would be a real calamity at a time when there was never greater demand for efficient, progressive young men. The University can not deny to the women of the State education of the highest type without producing a most harmful, retroactive effect upon the University itself.

Women trained in a college co-ordinate with the University would of necessity be under the influence of its honor system. They would have a traditional standard to maintain; and they would become sharers and disseminators of the first spirit which the University has always inspired in its students. Going out to the State as teachers, these women would spread far and wide an emulation of the honor system and