Difference between revisions of ".MTA2MjA.NDA1MDY"

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(Created page with "the days before water and rail carriers had been brought into service, and when transportation was slow and difficult due to the unimproved condition of the roads.")
 
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the days before water and rail carriers had been brought into service, and when transportation was slow and difficult due to the unimproved condition of the roads.
 
the days before water and rail carriers had been brought into service, and when transportation was slow and difficult due to the unimproved condition of the roads.
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Mr. Bruce lived in a day when the accumulation of land and of slaves, for the cultivation and care of crops, in particular tobacco, were objects more appealing to planters than trade; and when engagement in the latter was not considered the proper one for a gentleman who could otherwise provide for his family. Thus there was no competition for him, and his stores flourished.
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He wisely invested his profits in land and tobacco, as well as in other businesses. The late Dr. Kathleen Bruce, family historian and a noted writer, made an exhaustive study of her great-grandfather's papers, and revealed that between the years 1802 and 1837, James was the owner or dominant partner in, among other enterprises, twelve country stores, several flour mills, a fertilizer-plaster manufactory, a commercial blacksmith shop, several lumber yards, a cotton factory and two taverns. He was also the owner of sixteen plantations comprising many tens of thousands of acres, and nearly a thousand slaves.
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His major purchases of tobacco and other crops - wheat, oats, etc. - were made during the war of 1812, when prices in this country were very low. The purchases were stored in his many warehouses until after the war, when they were sold in England and other European countries at tremendous profits.

Revision as of 12:26, 19 May 2018

the days before water and rail carriers had been brought into service, and when transportation was slow and difficult due to the unimproved condition of the roads.

Mr. Bruce lived in a day when the accumulation of land and of slaves, for the cultivation and care of crops, in particular tobacco, were objects more appealing to planters than trade; and when engagement in the latter was not considered the proper one for a gentleman who could otherwise provide for his family. Thus there was no competition for him, and his stores flourished.

He wisely invested his profits in land and tobacco, as well as in other businesses. The late Dr. Kathleen Bruce, family historian and a noted writer, made an exhaustive study of her great-grandfather's papers, and revealed that between the years 1802 and 1837, James was the owner or dominant partner in, among other enterprises, twelve country stores, several flour mills, a fertilizer-plaster manufactory, a commercial blacksmith shop, several lumber yards, a cotton factory and two taverns. He was also the owner of sixteen plantations comprising many tens of thousands of acres, and nearly a thousand slaves.

His major purchases of tobacco and other crops - wheat, oats, etc. - were made during the war of 1812, when prices in this country were very low. The purchases were stored in his many warehouses until after the war, when they were sold in England and other European countries at tremendous profits.