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Dr. Powell is an ardent church worker, although he admits he's not quite as active as he used to be.  For a number of years he was Sunday School superintendent at Zion Methodist Church in Seaford and had charge of the men's Bible class for 40 years.
 
Dr. Powell is an ardent church worker, although he admits he's not quite as active as he used to be.  For a number of years he was Sunday School superintendent at Zion Methodist Church in Seaford and had charge of the men's Bible class for 40 years.
  
"I still go whever Mrs. Powell lets me," he said, "but I don't do too much talking.  My voice isn't as good as it once was."
+
"I still go whenever Mrs. Powell lets me," he said, "but I don't do too much talking.  My voice isn't as good as it once was."

Revision as of 12:23, 23 June 2018

March 14, 1965 [picture] Dr. L. O. Powell of Seaford checks vials of pills in his worn medical bag. As a general practioner he has outlasted five such bags in his 62 years of practice.

Doctor, Active at 89, Delivered Two Sets of Twins Same Night

Dr. L.O. Powell is more than just a general practitioner in Seaford. He's an institution in this small, spread-out York County community. He's the only doctor there.

He knows practically everybody and just about everybody knows him. He's been practicing medicine in the area for 62 years.

In fact, he's been doing one kind of a job or another since he was seven. And he's still going strong. He'll be 90 Oct. 9.

Dr. Powell has outlasted 10 automobiles since he first was converted to the horseless carriage in 1916. He has worn out five stout leather medical bags. And he has outlived most of his original patients.

About the only things which have managed to keep pace with this seemingly indestructible man are his wife, Margaret, and his 54-year-old two-story frame house (which looks exactly like a country doctor's home should look-weatherbeaten, but sturdy and everlastingly dependable).

Dr. Powell probably will die with his boots on and with a stethescope in his hand.

"I have no idea of retiring," he said recently. "That's a sign of laziness."

If there's anything that Dr. Powell isn't it's lazy. Besides his doctoring chores and his church work, he has a vegetable and flower garden to keep him busy.

LAST APRIL he came out of the hospital following a bout with a weakening blood condition. The doctor told him to just sit down and take it easy. His idea of taking it easy was to tend his vegetable garden, harvest it and stock his deep freeze before the fall frost set in.

"Sometimes he's a little stubborn," his wife confided.

The recent snows put a crimp in his flower gardening, however.

"You know," he said, "this is the first time I haven't been able to wear a fresh flower in my lapel every morning."

Snappy is the only word that adequately describes this amazing octogenarian.

Dr. Powell is an ardent church worker, although he admits he's not quite as active as he used to be. For a number of years he was Sunday School superintendent at Zion Methodist Church in Seaford and had charge of the men's Bible class for 40 years.

"I still go whenever Mrs. Powell lets me," he said, "but I don't do too much talking. My voice isn't as good as it once was."