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Coordinate College League, Richmond, Virginia, -3-, On last Tuesday, before Virginia left the city, we went over with Mr. Meredith this whole matter. Because it was one which we felt very deeply we wanted you personally to fully understand and be informed about, we asked Mr. Meredith to go to Charlottesville for the purpose of making the facts known to you. we felt it important that the matter should be treated as confidential by those to whom it was told, you as chairman of the University Committee to handle the situation there, as you deemed wise and proper under the new circumstances, which had arisen since our conference in Richmond, because of the fact if the opponents of the College should find out that an active campaign for the Co-ordinate College was not to be waged by the women.  They might very well use the situation thus created to develop Farmville or make William and Mary co-educational, which we are reliably informed is a proposition already receiving considerable attention and strong support.
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Coordinate College League
After Mr. Meredith's visit to the University for the above purpose was decided on and planned for Saturday, the bill drawn by Professor Lile was sent to him, which has again materially altered the situation. Last night Mr. Meredith was here and went over with me the results of the conference at the University last Saturday. As I understand the matter, the idea is to present to the Board of Visitors on Friday night next a bill which would command the support both of the University and our forces here, hoping to secure favorable action by them upon such bill. It seemed to me as I understood the facts, which Mr. Meredith reported on, that a bill satisfactory to all was almost in sight. So far as I am concerned personally, and I believe I may speak for the Women's Committee, the essential points in the bill are the following;
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Richmond, Virginia
1. That the college should be vitally a part of the University itself.
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2.. That the bill should state that it would be created "near the University" "not in the vicinity of Charlottesville."
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-3-
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On last Tuesday, before Virginia left the city, we went over with Mr. Meredith this whole matter. Because it was once which we felt very deeply we wanted you personally to fully understand and be informed about, we asked Mr. Meredith to go to Charlottesville for the purpose of making the facts known to you. We felt it important that the matter should be treated as confidential by those to whom it was told, you as chairman of the University Committee t handle the situation there, as you deemed wise and proper under the new circumstances, which had arisen since our conference in Richmond, because of the fact if the opponents of the College should find out that an active campaign for the Co-ordinate College was not to be waged by the women, they might very well use the situation thus created to develop Farmville or make William and Mary co-educational, which are reliably informed is a proposition already receiving considerable attention and strong support.  
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After Mr. Meredith's visit to the University for the above purpose was decided on and planned for Saturday, the bill drawn by Professor Lile was sent to him, which has again materially altered the situation. Last night Mr. Meredith was here and went over with me the results of the conference at the University last Saturday. As I understand the matter, the idea is to present to the Board of Visitors on Friday night next a bill which would command the support both of the University and our forces here, hoping to secure favorable action by them upon such bill. It seemed to me as I understood the facts, which Mr. Meredith reported on, that a bill satisfactory to all was almost in sight. So far as I am concerned personally, and I believe I may speak for the Woman's Committee, the essential points in the bill are the following:
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1. That the College should be vitally a part of the University itself.
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2. That the bill should state that it would be created "near the University" "not in the vicinity of Charlottesville."
 
3. That the clause with reference to the degree should be drawn as under the terms of the old bill.
 
3. That the clause with reference to the degree should be drawn as under the terms of the old bill.
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4. That the agreement reached in Washington and Charlottesville during our previous conference with reference to the site should be left as agreed upon there, namely, "the site to be selected by the Board of Visitors."
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This language, Virginia and I have always understood and still understand the terms of the bill as drawn by Mr. Meredith, leaves the Board of visitors entirely unhampered in the choice of site. If it seems necessary, however, in order to make it perfectly plain that they have authority to purchase, if in their judgment, after investigation and due consideration, it is thought best to do so, then the inclusion in the on hundred and fifty thousand dollar clause of the provision to use such part of this money as may be necessary to purchase, if need be, a site for the College, is, as indicated in a former letter of Mr. Meredith's to the University, satisfactory to us. In addition to these vital points, my own judgment and wish is that there be no included in the bill, Mr. Strode's clause about fees and the plain indication of what we all agreed is the

Revision as of 21:11, 22 August 2019

Coordinate College League Richmond, Virginia

-3- On last Tuesday, before Virginia left the city, we went over with Mr. Meredith this whole matter. Because it was once which we felt very deeply we wanted you personally to fully understand and be informed about, we asked Mr. Meredith to go to Charlottesville for the purpose of making the facts known to you. We felt it important that the matter should be treated as confidential by those to whom it was told, you as chairman of the University Committee t handle the situation there, as you deemed wise and proper under the new circumstances, which had arisen since our conference in Richmond, because of the fact if the opponents of the College should find out that an active campaign for the Co-ordinate College was not to be waged by the women, they might very well use the situation thus created to develop Farmville or make William and Mary co-educational, which are reliably informed is a proposition already receiving considerable attention and strong support. After Mr. Meredith's visit to the University for the above purpose was decided on and planned for Saturday, the bill drawn by Professor Lile was sent to him, which has again materially altered the situation. Last night Mr. Meredith was here and went over with me the results of the conference at the University last Saturday. As I understand the matter, the idea is to present to the Board of Visitors on Friday night next a bill which would command the support both of the University and our forces here, hoping to secure favorable action by them upon such bill. It seemed to me as I understood the facts, which Mr. Meredith reported on, that a bill satisfactory to all was almost in sight. So far as I am concerned personally, and I believe I may speak for the Woman's Committee, the essential points in the bill are the following: 1. That the College should be vitally a part of the University itself. 2. That the bill should state that it would be created "near the University" "not in the vicinity of Charlottesville." 3. That the clause with reference to the degree should be drawn as under the terms of the old bill. 4. That the agreement reached in Washington and Charlottesville during our previous conference with reference to the site should be left as agreed upon there, namely, "the site to be selected by the Board of Visitors." This language, Virginia and I have always understood and still understand the terms of the bill as drawn by Mr. Meredith, leaves the Board of visitors entirely unhampered in the choice of site. If it seems necessary, however, in order to make it perfectly plain that they have authority to purchase, if in their judgment, after investigation and due consideration, it is thought best to do so, then the inclusion in the on hundred and fifty thousand dollar clause of the provision to use such part of this money as may be necessary to purchase, if need be, a site for the College, is, as indicated in a former letter of Mr. Meredith's to the University, satisfactory to us. In addition to these vital points, my own judgment and wish is that there be no included in the bill, Mr. Strode's clause about fees and the plain indication of what we all agreed is the