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12 U.S. EMPLOYMENT SERVICE BULLETIN, SEPTEMBER 17, 1918 NEW TRAINING AND DILUTION SERVICE IS ESTABLISHED TO SPEED UP WAR PRODUCTION; TRAINS AND PLACES WORKERS. After survey of the general industrial situation and consideration of existing facilities for training and of the supply of and demand for skilled workers, the following plan has been drafted as a guide to an outline of organization of the Training and Dilution Service of the Department of Labor. Charles T. Clayton, formerly Assistant Director General of the United States Employment Service is director of this new service. The Training and Dilution Service is established to stimulate production of war supplies by organizing, training to increase the competency of wage earners, and to point out ways for rendering the existing supply of highly skilled workers sufficient through dilution. Incidental to such stimulation is the protection of wage earners against exploitation through unnecessary dilution of labor; of guarding established trade customs and standards against needless relaxation; and where they have been relaxed, of providing means for restoring just standards when the emergency is past. Service to Be Given. The Service will assist all departments of the Government. It will help any industry to secure more and better trained workers. , when such help will benefit war production. It will suggest improvements in training methods relating to processes, occupation and trades; will propose to factories improvements in organization to increase output through better working conditions; will draft training-department plans for manufacturers and organize and conduct such departments at their request either directly or in cooperation with the Federal Board for Vocational Education and State and municipal school authorities. Methods of Procedure. The work hitherto done by the Section on Industrial Training for the War Emergency of the Labor Committee, Advisory Commission, Council for National Defense, has been taken over by this Service and is being carried on and extended. Connection is being perfected with the several "production" departments of the Government (Ordinance, Quartermaster, Signal, medical and Chemical Supply Corps, Airplane Service, Navy Department., etc.) to secure prompt advice when a war contractor is in special difficulties for skilled labor which training may relieve. Superintendents of Training are being appointed and will be assigned to districts. The districting adopted by the Ordinance Department seems most suitable. Whenever a contractor applies for help the superintendent will be instructed to visit the plant. If an investigation of conditions is necessary and the Investigation and Inspection Service will be called in; if questions of policy regarding working conditions or employment of women in an industry arise, the Working Conditions or Women in Industry Services will be consulted.