Difference between revisions of ".MjU0MTU.ODkzMjc"

From Transcribe Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search
m (Protected ".MjU0MTU.ODkzMjc" ([Edit=Allow only administrators] (indefinite)))
 
(5 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 8: Line 8:
 
The uproar was such that the speakers in support of the amendments could hardly be heard, but not once did the Speaker call for order.
 
The uproar was such that the speakers in support of the amendments could hardly be heard, but not once did the Speaker call for order.
  
One of the patrons, Mr. Willis of Roanoke, a brilliant speaker, was on his feet righting for recognition when the pending question was called.  Proceedings were halted by the Speaker, however, in order to allow Mr. Philpott, from Powhatan to make the following remark:  "I think I know why the four patrons are in favor of woman suffrage.  They are young men.  They may be left in 'widowhood' and for that reason they are in favor of suffrage for women.
+
One of the patrons, Mr. Willis of Roanoke, a brilliant speaker, was on his feet righting for recognition when the pending question was called.  Proceedings were halted by the Speaker, however, in order to allow Mr. Philpott, from Powhatan to make the following remark:  "I think I know why the four patrons are in favor of woman suffrage.  They are young men.  They may be left in 'widowhood' and for that reason they are in favor of suffrage for women. The reason the gentleman from Lunenburg and I oppose this matter is that we are so old we can't git married agin, no how."  Prolonged applause, and in this unseemly manner, in the Legislative halls of the State of Virginia, the vote was taken on a question that is world-wide, the justice of which has never been questioned.  Is it small wonder that in the store of ridicule which the speaker by his contemptuous smile provoked and which his attitude encouraged that many who had promised to vote "aye" voted "no"?
 +
 
 +
The result was 74 against, 13 for; 13 not voting.  In 1912 the result was 85 against, 12 for; 3 not voting.
 +
 
 +
[stamp] MAR 14 1914

Latest revision as of 14:07, 19 December 2019

Alice O Taylor, Richmond-Va. [handwritten] Virginia 1914 L

The vote on the equal suffrage resolution was taken in the Virginia House of Delegates at one o'clock on Wednesday, March 11th, 1914. The result was 74 against, 13 for; 13 not voting. In 1912 the result was 85 against, 12 for; 3 not voting.

Speaker Edwin P. Cox, of Richmond, who is opposed to woman suffrage, gave over the control of the house from the time the Clerk began reading the amendments to the Constitution giving women the right to vote on equal terms with men; smiling broadly, he injected into the proceedings a spirit of levity which obtained throughout.

The uproar was such that the speakers in support of the amendments could hardly be heard, but not once did the Speaker call for order.

One of the patrons, Mr. Willis of Roanoke, a brilliant speaker, was on his feet righting for recognition when the pending question was called. Proceedings were halted by the Speaker, however, in order to allow Mr. Philpott, from Powhatan to make the following remark: "I think I know why the four patrons are in favor of woman suffrage. They are young men. They may be left in 'widowhood' and for that reason they are in favor of suffrage for women. The reason the gentleman from Lunenburg and I oppose this matter is that we are so old we can't git married agin, no how." Prolonged applause, and in this unseemly manner, in the Legislative halls of the State of Virginia, the vote was taken on a question that is world-wide, the justice of which has never been questioned. Is it small wonder that in the store of ridicule which the speaker by his contemptuous smile provoked and which his attitude encouraged that many who had promised to vote "aye" voted "no"?

The result was 74 against, 13 for; 13 not voting. In 1912 the result was 85 against, 12 for; 3 not voting.

[stamp] MAR 14 1914