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(1914]  EQUAL SUFFRAGE LEAG
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(1914]  EQUAL SUFFRAGE LEAGUE OF VIRGINIA  STATE HEADQUARTERS  RICHMOND, VA  COMMERCIAL BUILDING, SECOND STREET, BETWEEN BROAD AND GRACE
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Miss Blackwell;s Open Letter to Clergymen
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Th clergy are educators of public opinion. they should give their moral support to the equal suffrage movement for three reasons:  First because it is just; second, because in practice it makes for righteousness; third, because of the unrighteousness of the methods and interest arrayed against it.
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Its abstract justice is generally conceded. Its practical good results are established by the consensus of testimony from hundreds of clergymen in the enfranchised States. Mrs. Julia Ward Howe in 1910 sent a circular letter to all the Episcopal clergymen and to the Baptist, Congregational, Methodist and Presbyterian ministers in the States where women vote, asking if the results were good or bad. she received 624 replies. Of these, 62 were unfavorable, 46 in doubt, and 516 in favor. The answers from the Episcopal clergy were in favor, more than two to one,; from the Baptist ministers, seven to one; from the Congregational ministers, about eight to one; from the Methodist ministers, more than ten to one; and from the Presbyterian ministers, more than eleven to one. These figures speak for themselves.
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The  ministers were practically unanimous in saying that the ballot had done women good by broadening their minds and leading them to take a more intelligent interesst in public questions; that it had made them more intelligent companions for their husbands,

Revision as of 17:32, 17 January 2020

(1914] EQUAL SUFFRAGE LEAGUE OF VIRGINIA STATE HEADQUARTERS RICHMOND, VA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, SECOND STREET, BETWEEN BROAD AND GRACE

Miss Blackwell;s Open Letter to Clergymen Th clergy are educators of public opinion. they should give their moral support to the equal suffrage movement for three reasons: First because it is just; second, because in practice it makes for righteousness; third, because of the unrighteousness of the methods and interest arrayed against it.

Its abstract justice is generally conceded. Its practical good results are established by the consensus of testimony from hundreds of clergymen in the enfranchised States. Mrs. Julia Ward Howe in 1910 sent a circular letter to all the Episcopal clergymen and to the Baptist, Congregational, Methodist and Presbyterian ministers in the States where women vote, asking if the results were good or bad. she received 624 replies. Of these, 62 were unfavorable, 46 in doubt, and 516 in favor. The answers from the Episcopal clergy were in favor, more than two to one,; from the Baptist ministers, seven to one; from the Congregational ministers, about eight to one; from the Methodist ministers, more than ten to one; and from the Presbyterian ministers, more than eleven to one. These figures speak for themselves.

The ministers were practically unanimous in saying that the ballot had done women good by broadening their minds and leading them to take a more intelligent interesst in public questions; that it had made them more intelligent companions for their husbands,