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give and give them to your assistants to get in touch with first, taking into consideration what they have been giving. There are two reasons for going to them first. One is that a "bird in the hand is worth two in the busy" and we want to be sure that our own dear people who are going to make the sacrifice to give anyhow, will appear with "those present" on this occasion; the other is that it has a better psychological effect on the worker, to have something in hand when approaching the uncertain prospects. The next list to approach is that of members who have ever contributed those members who have shown exceptional interest during the season just past and those who have attended pay entertainments. Another group that has possibilities is that of people who were awfully interested three or four years ago and have dropped away long enough ago to be ready to come back. Then three or four awfully wealthy men in the community can be made to see the possibilities of the League, especially along the lines of citizenship education, sufficiently to pledge a hundred dollars or fifty or perhaps more than a hundred. With these lists you are prepared with ammunition. But no man, not even Hannibal General Lee, even with the resources of the world at his command could win alone. Glance over your Board, reviewing their possibilities in your own mind, and pick out ten who can help you best, and with the members of your finance committee, and, if you live in the city, add a name from different parts of the city, whether on the Board or not, a and call them to help you. Give them, say, five name to start with and ask for a report in twenty four hours. then give them five more. These are only suggestions. Take them for what they are worth; I shall be delighted to have you improve on them and pass the ideas on to the other Leagues. Guide yourself in regard to the size of the requests by what you think they will give, but making it a little higher as timidity makes us drop below what we really hope for. There are still "National Bonds" left and in approaching those people who pledged at the 1925 Gala Finance Lunche luncheon in Richmond, it will be well to ask them to give the same pledge that they gave last year, according to the planoutlined in my letter earlier in April, to go to the National, State and City, so that the same names will remain on the National books; they receiving teh "bonds" sa souvenirs. Ofcourse they are not real bonds but evidends of investment in teh work of the League.