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Work in Cantonment Increases in Interest - Men, Now in Fifth Week of Training, Begin to Love Soldiering.

Sixteen Weeks is course.

The fifth week of training, at least for most of the men in Camp Lee, has begun. From now on, the work, already interesting, will become even more fascinating as the weeks go by. Originally the war department laid down a course of sixteen weeks drill. It was thought that in this time the soldier could be made fairly proficient with his work, although it did not pretend to determine when movement of troops to France should begin.

This schedule, although obviously general in its character, is being followed as closely as possible at Camp Lee. Naturally there has been time lost by physical examinations, the administering of Typhoid prophylaxis, vaccination and the preparation of drill grounds and barracks. In addition many of the men have been here only a couple of weeks so that the fifth weeks instruction as proposed by the War Department has just begun for most of the troops, and, naturally, the schedule has had to be modified slightly for various reasons. Beginning with the earliest stage of physical exercise and school of the soldier, with lectures on discipline and other features of army life, the training has led up, through school of the squad and whistle and arm signals to extended order drills and exercises with rifle and bayonet, for the infantry. The artillery has kept equal pace in their own special subjects.

In more advanced phases.

Now the training has reached the point where it is possible to begin instruction in more advanced phases. Target practice is to begin soon, and and trench work, too, will be started before long. For almost two weeks the engineers have been hard at it, learning to solve the intricacies of trench digging, and the even more puzzling question of how to make a trench stay dug-that is, the revetment of trench walls to prevent the earth tumbling in on some unsuspecting young man when he thought himself safe from everything but poison gas and small trench inhabitants.

These practice trenches of the engineers may or may not be a part of the extensive trench system be constructed here, but they are primarily practice trenches for the engineers themselves. And, lest any of the young gentlemen with the blue hat cords get the impression that engineers do all the trench digging, let it be understood now that these same young gentlemen of the blue hat cord will dig their own earthy homes- both here and across the way. However, according to a cablegram from General Pershing, it is musketry and close order drill which are of paramount importance, and it is probably that even before instruction in trench construction begins that target practice, will be started.

The range - three miles long and a mile and a half across, is being laid out now, under the direction of Colonel Foreman, the divisions new range officer. The tract, only a few miles from the camp, will be ready within three weeks, when recruits probably will be given a try out. So extensive is the range that 240 men may fire at the same time at the 240 targets.

New Enfield to be used

The Krag rifle, which has been used for the manual of arms, will not be employed on the range. Instead, the new Enfield, the British ridlfe, chambered for American .30-caliber ammunition will be used. The firing will be done from a line a half mile long in the center of the range to provide a half mile safety belt along each side. The machine gun range will be on another side. The machine guns, Lewis and Colt, are arriving, and will be issued soon.

The artillery range, eight miles away is being acquired and work will be started on it soon. Here the artillery men will drill with guns ranging in caliber up to six inched.

Antigas instruction is provided for early on the schedule, and lectures on the methods of using and combating gas are to be given the men by their company officers.

Bayonet combat drill is to become more intensive. Some of the men already are vigorously assailing hostile positions protected by tench wire entanglements and hurdles over which the men must leap to reach the sapling dummings swing in the bayonet bays. Eventually men who show special capability in the various lines which the war have become the work [ILLEGIBLE] get opportunities to [ILLEGIBLE] as bombers, rifle specialists [ILLEGIBLE] men and the show their prowess. men snipers bayonets of life at like. At all events, the prospect [ILLEGIBLE] Camp Lee is anything but

CAMP PERSONNEL SYSTEM BECOMES ARMY STANDARD

Officers from Cantonments Here to Learn Efficiency Methods Recently Perfected

Camp Lees personnel system, which keeps a complete record of every enlisted man and every commissioned officer from the day of his arrival here to date, and includes each mans record before his entrance into the service of his country, has been selected by the War Department to be copied and installed in four other big training camps throughout the country. Four captains, personnel officers of their respective camps, accompanied by a civilian adviser from a National Army cantonment, arrived here, the First part of the week for the purpose of learning Camp Lee's efficient personnel methods. These officers are from cantonments occupied by former State guardsmen, and consisting of organizations from many parts of the country. Personnel systems were as numerous as the different outfits, and to bring the system to a central head and standardize it according to the Camp Lee one, is the purpose of these officers present visit.

Camp Green, Forty First Division, charlotte N.C., has sent Captain G.S. Tait, Captain Royal Mattice comes from Camp Sheridan, Thirty seventh Division, Montgomery, Ala., and Captain DM Simmons, from Camp McClellan, Twenty ninth Division, Anniston, ALA.

Mr. N.F. Dougherty civilian adviser at Camp Lee, and to whom, with Captain J.H. Downing, personnel officer at the Virginia camp, much of the credit of the excellence of this work is due has been designated to act as counselor to Captain Tait, of Camp Green. Mr Kendall Wisinger of Atlanta, GA, who has been acting as civilian adviser at Camp Gordon, will serve in like capacity for Captains Mattice and Simmons. Mr. Weisinger is a native of Richmond, VA, and his Northern trip combines pleasure with business.

How the System Works. Personnel Office: chief of staff speaking--"Pick me out a stenographer that speaks French, and seven expert sign painters. Want the stenographer for my office, and the sign painters to make clocks on the Liberty loan board out front." In a few minutes after this telephone conversation, the names of these men were in Colonel Waldron's hands. Within an hour the men had been transferred from their regiments, and were hard at work. "Transfer all the 'conscientous objectors' to the remount station and base hospital," was another problem recently given this busy office. In a surprisingly short time these men were listed, and the transfer made. These two samples will give you an idea of the many difficult demands made daily on the Personnel Office. Perhaps, too, it will give you a grasp of the far-reaching importance of this classification system, which as been evolved for the army. The best business brains of the country spent months of study over the army's problem of "how to find the man." How, out of hundreds of thousands of men from all walks of life, instantly to lay hands on the man for a particular task. Horseshoers, engineer graduates, mechanics, mule packers, chemists, etc., were drawn for the new army, and indescriminately mixed in regiments and companies. How to evolve order out of this chaos, how to fit the "round peg to the round hole" was the need of the hour.

Demand for Specialists. Modern warfare demands specialists. A Camouflage Company is a case in point. Here are its needs: 24 miscellaneous iron workers, 20 carpenters, 20 cabinetmakers, 13 plaster molders, 24 scene painters, 22 sign painters, 15 sheet metal workers, 20 stage carpenters, 2 chauffers, 14 property men, 4 wagoners, 14 sculptors, 5 cooks, 12 architects, 2 buglers 12 artists. In the Personnel Office may be found row upon row of cards, neatly tagged with orange and green "flags." There is a card for every draftie, with a yellow flag for proficiency, or a green for expertness neatly pasted over a number at the top of the card which corresponds to his particular trade, occupation or education. By glancing down the flags, all men of a given occupation may be selected instantly. Thus is America's business thought marshaling its forces for a disagreeable but necessary duty, democracy's intelligent preparation for the grim work of war.

CAMP LEE STANDS HIGH IN LIBERTY LOAN LIST (Continued From First Page.) Bakers, $18,850; Base Hospital, $18,250; Quartermaster Detachment, $16,200; Trench Mortar Battery, $15,250; Bakery Company No. 1, $11,050; Field Signal Battalion, $10,750; Auxiliary Remount Depot, $5,850; Motor Truck company, $5,150; Headquarters Detachment, One Hundred and Fifty-fifth Field Artillery Brigade, $3,000; Headquarters Detachment, One Hundred and Fifth-ninth Infantry Brigade, $1,550; Three Hundred and Fourteenth Machine Gun Battalion, $850; headquarters, One Hundred and Sixtieth Brigade, $250 and division headquarters, headquarters troops and subscriptions from miscellaneous sources, $173,850. From outside sources the Quartermaster Tranining School raised $195,150; the Depot Brigade, $165,300; the Headquarters Detachment, 159th Brigade, $10,200; 314th Machine Gun Battalion, $9,000, and the 314th Machine Gun Battalion, $3,000. Fine Work in Home Districts. The work of the committees sent back to their home districts to solicit subscriptions was hard and wearisome, but the results well justified the time and labor. Special teams were picked from each company, and these men were given furloughs to enable them to make the direct personal appeal back home. Undoubtedly, the stimulating effect on bond sales caused by the sight of men in uniform turned many more dollars into the load than the actual figures show. Only those amounts subscribed at the direct solicitation of a member of the Eightieth Division were counted, and we can only imagine the millions more subscribed by those who were influenced by the sight of the workers on the street, by hearing them in theaters, by reading of their campaign in the papers. Taking all in all, the scheme was highly successful and augers well for the result of the third loan, which it is expected will be launched some time in February.

HEROES OF FRANCE ARRIVE TO ASSIST DRAFTIES AT CAMP (continued from first page) follow him. And from what I have seen of your soldiers they will do the same. The American soldiers and the French soldiers will be brothers in arms and will continue fighting until we have won a glorious victory." The French officers have endeared themselves with all those who have come into contact with them. their coming here will cement closer ties of friendship, for they have come here on a mission to aid the officers of the eightieth Division to teach the soldiers in the tactics and methods employed in modern warfare. The present world strife has revolutionized warfare, and the American army will profit from the experience of the British and French armies and will not have to pay the heavy toll exacted by the mistakes made in the early months of ware. The soldiers in the Headquarters Troops were elated with the French noncomissioned officers were assigned to their barracks. They were received with genuine hospitality. They listen with interest to the stories the officers relate to them of their experiences in battle and they are regarded as real heroes.

Every Nationality is welcome as a depositor at our Savings Department! Doctors, Lawyers, Teachers, Farmers, Merchants, Clerks and Wage Earners in all walks of life are TO-DAY getting 4 per cent interest on their savings. Why not start your account here also? The Virginia National Bank Petersburg, VA. Safety, Service and 4 Per Cent.

AT YOUR SERVICE W.H. Harrison Co., Inc. Select your Thanksgiving and Christmas gifts now. Let us help you select your Gifts now from our large and varied stock. We will pack it for shipment and put it aside for you. Watch our windows. A Gift of HARDWARE--A Gift of SERVICE Phone 267 17-19 West Washington Street, Petersburg, VA., So Easy to Find.

To the eyes of a mother or other loved ones, no diamond ever sparkled like a good photograph of her Darling Soldier Boy. It takes a "Fostergraph" to bring the lovelight and tender tears--because it leaves "nothing missing but the voice." W.W. FOSTER Ninth Street, Richmond 10% Discount to All Military Men.

Victor His Master's Voice "The Victrola is the most popular thing brought into camp yet," says THE BAYONET on October 19th. D.W. Branch No. 33 Sycamore Street, Agent Victor Victrolas and Victor Records.

ADDITIONAL TROOPS OFF TO NEW TRAINING CAMPS Drafties From 8th to 10th Training Battalions Sent to Western Cantonment. Sunday, October 28, a trainload of troops from the 8th and 10th Training Battalions of the Depot Brigade moved out of the Norfolk and Western station at Camp Lee, to the cadence of 120 puffs a minute, bound for a cantonment in the West. The arrival at their Western destination was made on scheduled time a few days later. This is the second creditable sized movement of troops from the Eightieth Division to other posts, the first taking place with the send-off of 3,000 Pennsylvanians two weeks ago from the Depot Brigade. SEven hundred men, all from West Virginia, were included in the last movement. The 8th Training Battalion lost 305 soldiers, only ten men to each of the four companies being left behind. Three hundred and ninety-five men were taken from the 10th Battalion, leaving it with the same nucleus of about ten men per company as a skeleton organization. The 700 West Virginians left Camp Lee almost unnoticed. Early Sunday morning a few men in the barracks along the line of march to the Camp Lee railroad station were awakened by the steady tramp of a good many feet. Those sufficiently aroused to get up and look out of the nearest window saw a long and none too even line of troops, completely clothed, each lugging a well-filled barrack bag, and in addition some carrying suit cases. The departing troops were greeted with desultory shouts of "Where yuh going?" and "when yuh coming back?" which they answered by the rejoinder "Lord knows" for both inquiries. A fourteen-coach train was necessary to transport the troops to their new training quarters. Twelve coaches were for the accommodation of the soldiers, one took care of the baggage and one carried rations. A lieutenant from each company accompanied the soldiers, and are expected back at Camp Lee the last day of this week.

FIRST AMERICAN SHOTS GO INTO HUN TRENCHES (continued from first page) are preparing to lend immediate aid, and the possibility is that troops are being hastened across the western Italian frontier and by the way of Turin and Milan to the battle front in the East. From the head of the Gulf of Trieste, northward along the Isonzo front to beyond Tolimino, and thence westward through the Carnic Alps region to the Ploecken Pass, forming the eastern and northeastern boundaries of the Austro-Italian war front, the Germans and the Austro-Hungarian troops are operating swiftly and strongly against the Italians in an endeavor to crush the forces of General Cadorna. The Italian army, according to General Cadorna, is fulfilling its duty by keeping in check the enemy's advance into the plains. There has been one apparent redeeming feature in the chaotic condition which as manifested itself in the Italian situation, as it is reported that as a result of the Teutonic allied offensive, internal conditions in Italy are declared to have been unified, the preponderating idea of the entire population now being to abolish party lines in order to meet the situation in the best interest of the country. Even the Cabinet crisis is expected to be solved with comparative few changes in the portfolios. Fresh Gains in West. Fresh gains of terrain by the British and French forces are reported in the Ypres section. The new gains were obtained in another swift and decisive offensive launched over the front between the southern edge of the Houthclst wood and the region of Gheinvelt. Bad and soggy ground hampered the operations in some extent, and all the objectives set out for could not be taken. With the important railroad junction of Laon their objective, the French troops are continuing their pressure against the forces of the German Crown Prince north of the Aisne River.