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EIGHT THE BAYONET: CAMP LEE, VA., FRIDAY, MAY 10, 1918 cause the insurance is payable to him if he should become totally and permanently disabled through wound, sickness or accident, so that he would receive $5.75 monthly for every $1,000 of insurance purchases as long as he lived. The third reason is that while he may come through the war alive, he may not be in such physical condition to make him acceptable to the ordinary insurance companies, and may thus be unable to obtain any insurance whatever during the remainder of his life. In general, considering the very hazardous nature of the soldier's duties and occupation during war times, there is every reason why he should protect himself and any present or future dependents against misfortune or death or disablement while the opportunity is offered and open, and while he can do so at considerably less cost with the government as the "insurer" than would be possible with the ordinary life insurance company. If the solider will consider that in addition to these reasons he must avail himself of the government insurance within 120 days after his entry into the service, he will appreciate that the question of availing himself of this insurance now is one intimately connected with his own and the welfare of those dependent upon him, and that he cannot at any time advance any good reason for failure on his part to do so. Section VI. COMPENSATION. The Future Financial Obligations of the Government Toward the Solider and His Dependents. BY CAPT. C. M. JONES, A. G. D., N. A. 1. Compensation - a gratuity from the government . . . . . . 1 2. Relation to government insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3. Pensions versus compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3- 7 4. Disability benefits after discharge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 5. Death benefits to dependents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Unassignable and unattachable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 7. Discontinuance of six months' gratuity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 8. Restoration of earning power - Re-education and rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9/ Benefits paid only while actually dependent . . . . . . . 10 10. Qualification of soldier's widow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 11. Qualification of soldier's children . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 12. Filing claims for benefits . . . 13-15 13. The soldier's duties and privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1-Q. What are the soldier's financial duties and obligations with reference to the compensation features of this law, which provides for monthly payments in the event of disability or death in line of duty? A. The soldier has no financial duties or obligations to discharge to become entitled to receive compensation. Compensation is given in every case and to all soldiers when injured in line of duty, or to the soldier's dependents, within a restricted class, when he is killed in line of duty. All that the solider must do to insure that his dependents or himself in the case of death or discharge will receive the proper compensation payments is to perform properly and at all times his military duties. His right to compensation does not depend or require any money payment by the soldier to the government. 2-Q. What connection is there between this compensation and the government insurance? A. None. The compensation is absolutely independent and apart from any sums the soldier or his dependents may receive from the government insurance purchased. It is in addition to such insurance benefits, and is never in any case or at any time withheld or diminished by reason of such insurance. 3-Q. Will you give a brief outline of the compensation feature of the law and what protection it is intended to afford soldiers? A. Compensation is very much like the present pensions, except in the fundamental underlying thought. The pension, especially the service pension, has been regarded by many as a gratuity on the part of the government. The compensation paid under this law, is, however, very similar to the compensation paid under the many workman's compensation acts of a number of the States. The soldier is considered under this law as the military employee of the government, and if, in the course of his employment, or in other words, during the war and in battle, or otherwise in line of his military duties as a solider he becomes injured while discharging these duties, his employer, the United States government, pays compensation to him or his family. The government felt that under the draft act in drafting the breadwinner of the family, it in reality drafted the whole family. The family in giving up its head in serving the country, and the family in addition to the soldier, should be considered in fixing the amounts of money payable as compensation in the event of injury or death of the solider arising through wounds, disease or otherwise, and received in line of duty. Naturally the amount of compensation which will be different from the amount received by a soldier who is a bachelor, or single, will be different from the amount received by a soldier who has a family. The compensation will also vary from time to time as the family or dependents of the solider become larger or smaller, and as his disability becomes greater or less. If a soldier who at the time or first becoming entitled to compensation was married and had a wife and children entitled to receive compensation, if his wife afterwards died, and his children grew up and lost their right to the compensation, the soldier, if his disability still continued, would then get the same amount of compensations as a single soldier in like condition. The amount of compensation under the law ranges from $30 for bachelors to a maximum of $75 for a solider with a large family. If a solider, whether single or married, has a mother dependent upon him, he will receive monthly $10 in addition to his own compensation. If his disability is of such nature that he needs the constant aid of a nurse, the government will add up to $20 monthly for that purpose. The following chart will indicate generally the amounts of monthly compensation payable to soldiers and their dependents. There are so many, many conditions, attached to the compensation feature that it is not practicable to explain all of them in this primer. COMPENSATION. Amounts Are Those Received Each Month. In Case of Death. To Class "A" Only. W . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $25.00 W & C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $35.00 W & 2C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $47.50 W & 3C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $52.50