Difference between revisions of ".Mjg4MDg.OTkxMzg"

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10  WOMAN AND DEMOCRACY.
 
10  WOMAN AND DEMOCRACY.
 
would be something in it. The suffragettes have not yet equalled the turbulent emotionalism of their sedate brothers. But such argument might be thought rather tart and shrewish. Let us, then, listen to some fine old dowager, less acerb and more philosophic, as she argues the matter:
 
would be something in it. The suffragettes have not yet equalled the turbulent emotionalism of their sedate brothers. But such argument might be thought rather tart and shrewish. Let us, then, listen to some fine old dowager, less acerb and more philosophic, as she argues the matter:
"My sisters, let us not be too hard on the men. Of course they are not women and cannot be, but we must beware of arousing sex antagonism. Let us rather inquire if there be not plain indications in the nature of things of what man's sphere is. And if we look about, we see at once that this sphere is very definitely marked out.
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"My sisters, let us not be too hard on the men. Of course they are not women and cannot be, but we must beware of arousing sex antagonism. Let us rather inquire if there be not plain indications in the nature of things of what man's sphere is. And if we look about, we see at once that this sphere is very definitely marked out. Men are manifestly intended tp be the breadwinners of the race and the fathers of the race. And the sphere thus indicated is certainly great enough and high enough to consume all masculine energy and satisfy all masculine ambition. Let us, then, be careful of adding to the labors of men the additional burden of thinking on political problems.

Revision as of 14:47, 17 February 2020

10 WOMAN AND DEMOCRACY. would be something in it. The suffragettes have not yet equalled the turbulent emotionalism of their sedate brothers. But such argument might be thought rather tart and shrewish. Let us, then, listen to some fine old dowager, less acerb and more philosophic, as she argues the matter: "My sisters, let us not be too hard on the men. Of course they are not women and cannot be, but we must beware of arousing sex antagonism. Let us rather inquire if there be not plain indications in the nature of things of what man's sphere is. And if we look about, we see at once that this sphere is very definitely marked out. Men are manifestly intended tp be the breadwinners of the race and the fathers of the race. And the sphere thus indicated is certainly great enough and high enough to consume all masculine energy and satisfy all masculine ambition. Let us, then, be careful of adding to the labors of men the additional burden of thinking on political problems.