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There has taken place also vast industrial changes which make woman suffrage inevitable. Women invented the industries at a time when men's occupation was chiefly hunting, fishing and fighting; and for centuries industry was carried on entirely in the home. Through the invention of machinery and the rise of modern capitalism, practically all the industries were carried out of homes into factories. When we speak of " the unfortunate fact that women have pressed into the industries," or say that women are competing with men  in the industries and driving them out, we are not quite speaking the truth; for the men entered the industries of the women, who were the bakers, the dairy maids, the tailors, the weavers, the spinners, etc. Women simply followed their home occupations out into the factory, because they could not afford to be idle. These working women feel the need of the ballot for their protection and development. But there are also thousands of women who, released from the cares of the old home industries, are not compelled to enter the factory for a livelihood; women whose hands have been, as it were, set free, so that they have ample time for social chit-chat, bridge whilst and social clubs, poodles and parrots - which time might be far better spent in some serious aid given to solving the problems of civic improvement and political reform. Between these two classes are thousands of women whose hands are busy bringing up their children and making their homes happy; who, like great multitudes of our busy men of business, could give some thought to their country's welfare; and when their husbands deposit their ballots for laws that will make for business prosperity, they, the wives, can deposit theirs in favor of the prosperity of their homes.
 
There has taken place also vast industrial changes which make woman suffrage inevitable. Women invented the industries at a time when men's occupation was chiefly hunting, fishing and fighting; and for centuries industry was carried on entirely in the home. Through the invention of machinery and the rise of modern capitalism, practically all the industries were carried out of homes into factories. When we speak of " the unfortunate fact that women have pressed into the industries," or say that women are competing with men  in the industries and driving them out, we are not quite speaking the truth; for the men entered the industries of the women, who were the bakers, the dairy maids, the tailors, the weavers, the spinners, etc. Women simply followed their home occupations out into the factory, because they could not afford to be idle. These working women feel the need of the ballot for their protection and development. But there are also thousands of women who, released from the cares of the old home industries, are not compelled to enter the factory for a livelihood; women whose hands have been, as it were, set free, so that they have ample time for social chit-chat, bridge whilst and social clubs, poodles and parrots - which time might be far better spent in some serious aid given to solving the problems of civic improvement and political reform. Between these two classes are thousands of women whose hands are busy bringing up their children and making their homes happy; who, like great multitudes of our busy men of business, could give some thought to their country's welfare; and when their husbands deposit their ballots for laws that will make for business prosperity, they, the wives, can deposit theirs in favor of the prosperity of their homes.
 
No less significant are the changes that have taken place in woman herself. She was once regarded as simply an appurtenance to man, or as his property. She was classed along with his ox and his ass and anything else that was his. She received recognition alone by virtue of her relation to a man, either as mother or as wife or as sister. Woman was simply wifman. Now she is recognized as a person. Among sensible people she is not a clinging vine, more a cross between an angel and an idiot. It has been discovered that she has a mind that is capable of the highest development, and of grappling with the most difficult problems.
 
No less significant are the changes that have taken place in woman herself. She was once regarded as simply an appurtenance to man, or as his property. She was classed along with his ox and his ass and anything else that was his. She received recognition alone by virtue of her relation to a man, either as mother or as wife or as sister. Woman was simply wifman. Now she is recognized as a person. Among sensible people she is not a clinging vine, more a cross between an angel and an idiot. It has been discovered that she has a mind that is capable of the highest development, and of grappling with the most difficult problems.
This suggests the evident fact that modern education has wrought a wonderful change in womanhood. Man is no longer the educated sex.
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This suggests the evident fact that modern education has wrought a wonderful change in womanhood. Man is no longer the educated sex. Today more women are taking advantage of public education than men. Twice as many girls graduate from our high schools as boys. they are graduating Fromm out colleges and universities, after thorough courses in history, economics, political science and sociology. If we would exclude them from taking part in government, we have begun too late. To equip our women for making a contribution to the government of their country and then to say they shall not, is at once cruel and futile.

Revision as of 15:27, 13 February 2020

Salisbury, when prime minister of England, said in company of suffragists: "I am for woman suffrage, because I believe in a representative government. We have in Parliament every interest represented except the greatest interest of all, the labor interest, the farming interests, etc., but not the home interest . . . The women would naturally represent home and childhood and the things next to them in their lives. Therefore I favor your cause." There has taken place also vast industrial changes which make woman suffrage inevitable. Women invented the industries at a time when men's occupation was chiefly hunting, fishing and fighting; and for centuries industry was carried on entirely in the home. Through the invention of machinery and the rise of modern capitalism, practically all the industries were carried out of homes into factories. When we speak of " the unfortunate fact that women have pressed into the industries," or say that women are competing with men in the industries and driving them out, we are not quite speaking the truth; for the men entered the industries of the women, who were the bakers, the dairy maids, the tailors, the weavers, the spinners, etc. Women simply followed their home occupations out into the factory, because they could not afford to be idle. These working women feel the need of the ballot for their protection and development. But there are also thousands of women who, released from the cares of the old home industries, are not compelled to enter the factory for a livelihood; women whose hands have been, as it were, set free, so that they have ample time for social chit-chat, bridge whilst and social clubs, poodles and parrots - which time might be far better spent in some serious aid given to solving the problems of civic improvement and political reform. Between these two classes are thousands of women whose hands are busy bringing up their children and making their homes happy; who, like great multitudes of our busy men of business, could give some thought to their country's welfare; and when their husbands deposit their ballots for laws that will make for business prosperity, they, the wives, can deposit theirs in favor of the prosperity of their homes. No less significant are the changes that have taken place in woman herself. She was once regarded as simply an appurtenance to man, or as his property. She was classed along with his ox and his ass and anything else that was his. She received recognition alone by virtue of her relation to a man, either as mother or as wife or as sister. Woman was simply wifman. Now she is recognized as a person. Among sensible people she is not a clinging vine, more a cross between an angel and an idiot. It has been discovered that she has a mind that is capable of the highest development, and of grappling with the most difficult problems. This suggests the evident fact that modern education has wrought a wonderful change in womanhood. Man is no longer the educated sex. Today more women are taking advantage of public education than men. Twice as many girls graduate from our high schools as boys. they are graduating Fromm out colleges and universities, after thorough courses in history, economics, political science and sociology. If we would exclude them from taking part in government, we have begun too late. To equip our women for making a contribution to the government of their country and then to say they shall not, is at once cruel and futile.