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manner. It was all the work of about two minutes. Each one of these balloons cost the American army twelve thousand dollars. We had seen no dead soldiers up to this time, but on the following morning found that several of the wounded who had been placed in the shock yard, that is, where the grave cases had been held, had died. These were buried nearby. We had received about ten replacements the previous day and these men were pressed in for this service. These replacements included Zahn, Biggs, Boggs, Barnes, Wolf, and a sergeant, Conroy. The wounded were steadily arriving and soon all the available floor space in the big building was filled with stretchers. Some waited their turn to be looked at by the medical officers, others who had been seen were waiting to be evacuated. At this time the barn at the side of the inn was used to receive the overflow. A heavy rain storm set in during the third night and continued all night long. The ambulances would start to arrive in the morning about seven o'clock and continue to roll up all day long until about midnight. From this time on we stayed on duty, sleeping on stretchers with one man awake. When an ambulance would come up at perhaps two or three o'clock in the morning, I would awaken the nearest man and we would unload the ambulance and lie down again. The officers stayed at their posts in a like manner. As we were at this time from about one to three miles from the German artillery, no lights were allowed at night outside the hospital and all windows had to be darkened so that no light would be visible to those outside. To effect this, each window was draped with a heavy black blanket and the incoming stretchers were brought in by having a double door, both doors covered with a loose blanket which fell behind us as we entered. -60-