Difference between revisions of ".MTUwMTQ.NTc0MTk"

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(Created page with "the counter when mess was being served was usually No. 1. Our Larson usually served out the Java; Doc was always on the butter and had a cleaver within reach i")
 
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the counter when mess was being served was usually No. 1. Our Larson usually served out the Java; Doc was always on the butter and had a cleaver within reach i
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the counter when mess was being served was usually No. 1. Our Larson usually served out the Java; Doc was always on the butter and had a cleaver within reach in case any of the boys became rambunctious, and informed Doc the rations were on the bum. Being No. 1 at the counter where the first dish was served out, always gave me the opportunity of seeing the boys as they arrived. Of the eighty men who made up the mess line they presented eighty different temperaments and styles. Five or six were usually waiting half an hour before mess was served. This number included Harry Connor, Alfred Hall, Pete Snyder, Nigger-hunter Hoover, Amyotte and Hallgren. The gold brick twins were always on the job rain or shine, and there was always an argument as to the status of the company's mechanics, who claimed they were rated as non-coms, while Hall and Hoover vigorously opposed this interpretation, but they were usually successful in being served first.
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I often had surprises in finding out what was contained in a mess kit. Ordinarily the army mess kit contained under the lid a knife, fork and spoon, but I remember one day when I was serving out beef stew, that Roger Taylor walked up fifteen minutes late, opened up his mess kit with a bang and disclosed a dead rat inside. Next came Pete Snyder who pulled open his lid and there was a live snake. Next came Lentz who raised his lid and a live bull frog jumped out into the beef stew. I ran for a dipper and rescued the reptile from its hot bath without anybody being the wiser.
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Hallgren left the company for awhile on a pass to visit his brother's grave. He was in the Engineers and had been killed shortly after we arrived in France. Before we left Camp Lee he had written to Hallgren to bring over all the tobacco in every shape that he could, as this article was impossible to purchase. Whether Hallgren
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Revision as of 15:10, 28 August 2018

the counter when mess was being served was usually No. 1. Our Larson usually served out the Java; Doc was always on the butter and had a cleaver within reach in case any of the boys became rambunctious, and informed Doc the rations were on the bum. Being No. 1 at the counter where the first dish was served out, always gave me the opportunity of seeing the boys as they arrived. Of the eighty men who made up the mess line they presented eighty different temperaments and styles. Five or six were usually waiting half an hour before mess was served. This number included Harry Connor, Alfred Hall, Pete Snyder, Nigger-hunter Hoover, Amyotte and Hallgren. The gold brick twins were always on the job rain or shine, and there was always an argument as to the status of the company's mechanics, who claimed they were rated as non-coms, while Hall and Hoover vigorously opposed this interpretation, but they were usually successful in being served first. I often had surprises in finding out what was contained in a mess kit. Ordinarily the army mess kit contained under the lid a knife, fork and spoon, but I remember one day when I was serving out beef stew, that Roger Taylor walked up fifteen minutes late, opened up his mess kit with a bang and disclosed a dead rat inside. Next came Pete Snyder who pulled open his lid and there was a live snake. Next came Lentz who raised his lid and a live bull frog jumped out into the beef stew. I ran for a dipper and rescued the reptile from its hot bath without anybody being the wiser. Hallgren left the company for awhile on a pass to visit his brother's grave. He was in the Engineers and had been killed shortly after we arrived in France. Before we left Camp Lee he had written to Hallgren to bring over all the tobacco in every shape that he could, as this article was impossible to purchase. Whether Hallgren -102-