Difference between revisions of ".MjEyNTU.ODA1OTA"

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as much or more? Does he think it true economy to repurchase all the
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as much or more? Does he think it true economy to repurchase all the costly apparatus which has been accumulated at Charlottesville for work of research? Can he save money for the state by refusing to employ an administrative staff already assembled and trained for its work? Or does he mean to offer the women of Virginia the mere effigy of a college - a college with a few cheap books, a few cheap instruments, a few cheap hirelings to run it?
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2) The faculty of the separate woman's college can be made equal to the faculty of the University if adequate salaries are provided.
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It is perfectly well known to all who are not absolutely ignorant of educational affairs that separate women's colleges, salaries being equal, lose their best professors to the men's universities. They can only keep them by paying more and this they have never been able to do. Bryn Mawr, the best of all the separate woman's colleges in America, is considered by the most brilliant young scholars in the academic world a splendid perch from which to take flight. All these colleges have the same experience; the second rate man the

Revision as of 14:50, 6 July 2020

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as much or more? Does he think it true economy to repurchase all the costly apparatus which has been accumulated at Charlottesville for work of research? Can he save money for the state by refusing to employ an administrative staff already assembled and trained for its work? Or does he mean to offer the women of Virginia the mere effigy of a college - a college with a few cheap books, a few cheap instruments, a few cheap hirelings to run it? 2) The faculty of the separate woman's college can be made equal to the faculty of the University if adequate salaries are provided. It is perfectly well known to all who are not absolutely ignorant of educational affairs that separate women's colleges, salaries being equal, lose their best professors to the men's universities. They can only keep them by paying more and this they have never been able to do. Bryn Mawr, the best of all the separate woman's colleges in America, is considered by the most brilliant young scholars in the academic world a splendid perch from which to take flight. All these colleges have the same experience; the second rate man the