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Copy For Mrs. Beverly B. Munford Ed Turner-Dispatch City Sons or Daughgers Sir: I have read Mr. B. Rand Wellford's letter in your paper opposing
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Copy For Mrs. Beverly B. Munford Ed Turner-Dispatch City Sons or Daughters Sir: I have read Mr. B. Rand Wellford's letter in your paper opposing the Woman's Co-Ordinate College at the University. The arguments that the public schools have needs, and that some other place than the University is the place for a Woman's College are not new, though diametrically opposed to each other. The State has always been liberal as she should be and will continue such liberality to her public schools. If the University is not a public school it should be made so as Mr. Jefferson intended it to be. But is it not time for the State who does so much for her sons to do something for her daughters? A Virginia boy can go to the University and get the best teaching in the world at the State's expense, but a Virginia girl, unless her parents are rich, has no place to go for the best education. The good Mother makes no distinction in the love she bears her children. She loves her eighteen and twenty year old daughters as much as she does her eighteen and twenty-year old sons, and as well as she does her eight and ten year old sons and daughters and would see them equally provided for. Respectfully, Rosewell Page Richd Va January 19 1916

Latest revision as of 13:21, 28 October 2020

Copy For Mrs. Beverly B. Munford Ed Turner-Dispatch City Sons or Daughters Sir: I have read Mr. B. Rand Wellford's letter in your paper opposing the Woman's Co-Ordinate College at the University. The arguments that the public schools have needs, and that some other place than the University is the place for a Woman's College are not new, though diametrically opposed to each other. The State has always been liberal as she should be and will continue such liberality to her public schools. If the University is not a public school it should be made so as Mr. Jefferson intended it to be. But is it not time for the State who does so much for her sons to do something for her daughters? A Virginia boy can go to the University and get the best teaching in the world at the State's expense, but a Virginia girl, unless her parents are rich, has no place to go for the best education. The good Mother makes no distinction in the love she bears her children. She loves her eighteen and twenty year old daughters as much as she does her eighteen and twenty-year old sons, and as well as she does her eight and ten year old sons and daughters and would see them equally provided for. Respectfully, Rosewell Page Richd Va January 19 1916