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Equal Suffrage League of Virginia. President, Mrs. B. B. Valentine, 2338 Monument Ave., Richmond, VA. Hon. Vice-Presidents. Mrs. Louise Collier Willcox. Norfolk, VA. Miss Ellen Glasgow, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Langkey Bosher, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Waller Barret, Alexandria, VA. Vice-Presidents. Miss Mary Johnston, Richmond, VA. Mrs. J. H. Lewis, Lynchburg, VA. Mrs. C. V. Meredith, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Stephen Putney, Wytheville, VA. Mrs. G. M. Smithdeal, Recording Secretary. Mrs. Alice O. Taylor, Headquarters Secretary. Mrs. E. G. Kidd, Treasurer. Mrs. John S. Munce, Auditor, of Richmond, VA. State Headquarters, Richmond, VA. Commercial Building, Second Street Between Broad and Grage. March 19-1914. My dear Mrs. Townsend:- In reply to your card, will state that in 1914 74 members of the Legislature voted against the suffrage resolution, 13 for, and 13 did not vote at all. In 1912, 85 members voted against, 12 for, and 3 did not vote. Personally, I feel that we would have received a much larger vote for our measure had the Speaker of the House been at all fair.
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Equal Suffrage League of Virginia. President, Mrs. B. B. Valentine, 2338 Monument Ave., Richmond, VA. Hon. Vice-Presidents. Mrs. Louise Collier Willcox. Norfolk, VA. Miss Ellen Glasgow, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Langkey Bosher, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Waller Barret, Alexandria, VA. Vice-Presidents. Miss Mary Johnston, Richmond, VA. Mrs. J. H. Lewis, Lynchburg, VA. Mrs. C. V. Meredith, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Stephen Putney, Wytheville, VA. Mrs. G. M. Smithdeal, Recording Secretary. Mrs. Alice O. Taylor, Headquarters Secretary. Mrs. E. G. Kidd, Treasurer. Mrs. John S. Munce, Auditor, of Richmond, VA. State Headquarters, Richmond, VA. Commercial Building, Second Street Between Broad and Grage. March 19-1914. My dear Mrs. Townsend:- In reply to your card, will state that in 1914 74 members of the Legislature voted against the suffrage resolution, 13 for, and 13 did not vote at all. In 1912, 85 members voted against, 12 for, and 3 did not vote. Personally, I feel that we would have received a much larger vote for our measure had the Speaker of the House been at all fair. As it was, when the Clerk read the proposed amendments to the Constitution, he smiled, and continued to smile throughout the entire reading. This was enough for the House, and the members took their cue from him, jesting, laughing, sneering and being generally so disorderly that the patrons of the measure could scarcely be heard. They were constantly interrupted by opponents asking trivial questions, and not once throughout the entire proceedings did the Speaker call for order. The speaker was in favor of the co-ordinate college bill, and when it came up for the vote, his demeanor was dignified, and he rapped for order 25 or 30 times before the vote was finally taken.

Revision as of 22:38, 26 August 2019

Equal Suffrage League of Virginia. President, Mrs. B. B. Valentine, 2338 Monument Ave., Richmond, VA. Hon. Vice-Presidents. Mrs. Louise Collier Willcox. Norfolk, VA. Miss Ellen Glasgow, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Langkey Bosher, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Kate Waller Barret, Alexandria, VA. Vice-Presidents. Miss Mary Johnston, Richmond, VA. Mrs. J. H. Lewis, Lynchburg, VA. Mrs. C. V. Meredith, Richmond, VA. Mrs. Stephen Putney, Wytheville, VA. Mrs. G. M. Smithdeal, Recording Secretary. Mrs. Alice O. Taylor, Headquarters Secretary. Mrs. E. G. Kidd, Treasurer. Mrs. John S. Munce, Auditor, of Richmond, VA. State Headquarters, Richmond, VA. Commercial Building, Second Street Between Broad and Grage. March 19-1914. My dear Mrs. Townsend:- In reply to your card, will state that in 1914 74 members of the Legislature voted against the suffrage resolution, 13 for, and 13 did not vote at all. In 1912, 85 members voted against, 12 for, and 3 did not vote. Personally, I feel that we would have received a much larger vote for our measure had the Speaker of the House been at all fair. As it was, when the Clerk read the proposed amendments to the Constitution, he smiled, and continued to smile throughout the entire reading. This was enough for the House, and the members took their cue from him, jesting, laughing, sneering and being generally so disorderly that the patrons of the measure could scarcely be heard. They were constantly interrupted by opponents asking trivial questions, and not once throughout the entire proceedings did the Speaker call for order. The speaker was in favor of the co-ordinate college bill, and when it came up for the vote, his demeanor was dignified, and he rapped for order 25 or 30 times before the vote was finally taken.