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Second Statement
 
Second Statement
  
 
Jordan's View
 
Jordan's View
  
Charging Abram, Abner, Fendall, and Nancy Torrence as partnership slaves, and Long's services as common [burthen?] Tho' Jordan, as before stated, contends that Long should have no allowance for services, in as much as he was necessarily called to Mississippi on private business, and undertook the charge (if he may be said to have had control, which he on all occasions, in matters of importance seems to have & others yielded to E. W. Rosser) thro' friendly favor to Vicksburg and afterwards to New Orleans in order to collect from out of the first sales of the negroes, a large amo: One to him by Rosser, which was paid him, [illegible] receiving which he immediately returned himome leaving young Rosser the entire [illegible] management of all matters.
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Charging Abram, Abner, Fendall, and Nancy Torrence as partnership slaves, and Long's services as common burthen. Tho' Jordan, as before stated, contends that Long should have no allowance for services, in as much as he was necessarily called to Mississippi on private business, and undertook the charge (if he may be said to have had control, which he on all occasions, in matters of importance seems to have rather yielded to E. W. Rosser) thro' friendly favor to Vicksburg and afterwards to New Orleans in order to collect from out of the first sales of the negroes, a large amo: due to him by Rosser, which was paid him, upon receiving which he immediately returned home leaving young Rosser the entire subsequent management of all matters.

Latest revision as of 14:16, 28 December 2020

16 Second Statement

Jordan's View

Charging Abram, Abner, Fendall, and Nancy Torrence as partnership slaves, and Long's services as common burthen. Tho' Jordan, as before stated, contends that Long should have no allowance for services, in as much as he was necessarily called to Mississippi on private business, and undertook the charge (if he may be said to have had control, which he on all occasions, in matters of importance seems to have rather yielded to E. W. Rosser) thro' friendly favor to Vicksburg and afterwards to New Orleans in order to collect from out of the first sales of the negroes, a large amo: due to him by Rosser, which was paid him, upon receiving which he immediately returned home leaving young Rosser the entire subsequent management of all matters.