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I received your letter of the 2nd. August this morning my dearest mother. I had been anxiously expecting to hear from you for it takes a letter such an [age?] to arrive here that is old before it "[illegible]" I think Mrs. Jamison has now misinformed concerning Mr. Miller I saw him the day he left here & he had gone to visit his friends. for the first time since his removal here & told me that any letter or package sent to Williams the silver smith who lives in Washington not far from Godsey's he would take charge of with pleasure & even said he would ride over to Arlington if he had time so that he could have had no idea of returning immediately the things I wrote for are of no immediate consequence so do not trouble yourself about them.  
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I received your letter of the 2d August this morning my dearest Mother. I had been anxiously expecting to hear from you for it takes a letter such an age to arrive here that it is old before it comes - I think Mrs. Jamieson has been misinformed concerning Mr. Miller I saw him the day he left here & he had gone to visit his friends for the first time since his removal here, & told me that any letter or package sent to Williams the silver smith who lives in Washington not far from Gadsby's he would take charge of with pleasure He even said he would ride over to Arlington if he had time, so that he could have had no idea of returning immediately The things I wrote for are of no immediate consequence so do not trouble yourself about them. I am afraid that money must turn out like the cruse of oil to answer all the purposes to which it is appropriated but you know there will be more forth-coming soon. I am glad you like my portraits better I did not like either of them altogether but I had only a moment to look at them after they were finished. You must take the opinion of strangers generally as you are too partial a judge What does Aunt Maria think of them You have no idea how much company yours is for me & the likeness grows upon me Mrs. Skinker said she thought it very striking I see her frequently & she is a very lovely woman, Tell Mr Wms I have had your portrait stretched on a wooden frame but will not have a better one put on until I get back & will have it to match Fathers, are they both the same size? Remember us most affectionately to him & [Thee?] & tell them they must write to me  I think they will find a visit to Chantilly both pleasant [illegible-torn] - [Thee?] must keep up her
I am afraid that money must turn out like the cruse of oil to answer all the purposes to which it is appropriated but you know there will be more forth-coming soon. I am told you like my portion better I did not like letter of them
 

Latest revision as of 11:57, 11 February 2018

I received your letter of the 2d August this morning my dearest Mother. I had been anxiously expecting to hear from you for it takes a letter such an age to arrive here that it is old before it comes - I think Mrs. Jamieson has been misinformed concerning Mr. Miller I saw him the day he left here & he had gone to visit his friends for the first time since his removal here, & told me that any letter or package sent to Williams the silver smith who lives in Washington not far from Gadsby's he would take charge of with pleasure He even said he would ride over to Arlington if he had time, so that he could have had no idea of returning immediately The things I wrote for are of no immediate consequence so do not trouble yourself about them. I am afraid that money must turn out like the cruse of oil to answer all the purposes to which it is appropriated but you know there will be more forth-coming soon. I am glad you like my portraits better I did not like either of them altogether but I had only a moment to look at them after they were finished. You must take the opinion of strangers generally as you are too partial a judge What does Aunt Maria think of them You have no idea how much company yours is for me & the likeness grows upon me Mrs. Skinker said she thought it very striking I see her frequently & she is a very lovely woman, Tell Mr Wms I have had your portrait stretched on a wooden frame but will not have a better one put on until I get back & will have it to match Fathers, are they both the same size? Remember us most affectionately to him & [Thee?] & tell them they must write to me I think they will find a visit to Chantilly both pleasant [illegible-torn] - [Thee?] must keep up her